Colorado voters repeal Gallagher Amendment | CraigDailyPress.com
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Colorado voters repeal Gallagher Amendment

Voters also approved a state income tax cut

Saja Hindi / Denver Post
The Colorado State Capitol Building on Jan 19, 2019.
Eric Lubbers / Colorado Sun

One of the twin pillars of Colorado tax law — a measure that has withstood prior attempts to dismantle it — was repealed Tuesday with most of the vote counted.

Amendment B, which had almost 58% support with 82% of the vote counted, proposed getting rid of the state’s 1982 Gallagher Amendment. Proponents called it a “huge win” for Coloradans, businesses, schools and fire districts.

Even as voters gave local governments more fiscal breathing room with that measure, though, they also appeared to be passing a state income tax that will mean less revenue for the state.

Proposition 116, the income tax cut, also passed late Tuesday with nearly 57% support.

One of the twin pillars of Colorado tax law — a measure that has withstood prior attempts to dismantle it — was repealed Tuesday with most of the vote counted.

Amendment B, which had almost 58% support with 82% of the vote counted, proposed getting rid of the state’s 1982 Gallagher Amendment. Proponents called it a “huge win” for Coloradans, businesses, schools and fire districts.

Even as voters gave local governments more fiscal breathing room with that measure, though, they also appeared to be passing a state income tax that will mean less revenue for the state.

Proposition 116, the income tax cut, also passed late Tuesday with nearly 57% support.

Colorado voters, who seemed to be in a “yes” mood this year, were also supporting a third state fiscal measure, Proposition 117, with a narrower 52% support. If it passes, it will require voter approval before the state can create some new fees.

The Gallagher Amendment ties residential property tax rates to commercial property tax rates, requiring that homeowners pay no more than 45% of total property taxes, while commercial property owners always pay 29% of their properties’ value. The residential tax rate fluctuates to maintain the 45/55 split.

As home values have gone up — particularly on the Front Range — the residential rate has been cut to keep homeowners’ share of taxes below the 45% threshold. Commercial properties, meanwhile, have picked up more of the tax burden.

A bipartisan group of lawmakers referred the measure to the ballot in the 2020 legislative session — the latest of several attempts to get rid of Gallagher.

To read the rest of the Denver Post article, click here.


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