Our View: Educate kids about sexual violence | CraigDailyPress.com

Our View: Educate kids about sexual violence

On Wednesday, communities across the globe — including Craig — recognized the dangers associated with sexual violence on what's been dubbed "Denim Day."

Denim Day evolved in response to a ruling by the Italian Supreme Court where a rape conviction was reversed after judges said that, because the victim was wearing tight jeans, she must have helped her rapist remove her jeans, implying consent.

Editorial board

Noelle Leavitt Riley — newspaper representative

Andy Bockelman — newspaper representative

Terry Carwile — community representative

Dan Davidson — community representative

Recommended Stories For You

After the ruling, women in the Italian Parliament came to work dressed in jeans in solidarity with the victim. Fast-forward 18 years later, and it's become a worldwide trend to raise awareness by wearing denim on Denim Day.

Advocates Crisis Support Services' in Craig recently hired Executive Director Chuck Grobe who visited the county commissioners and city council this week to proclaim April as Sexual Violence Awareness Month.

We'd like to thank Grobe and Advocates for bringing this to the forefront of our community. We also think it's an excellent time to remind our readers about the seriousness of sexual violence and how to decrease or prevent such crimes in Craig and Moffat County.

What is consent? Consent is when a person says "yes."

Perhaps the best way to prevent inappropriate comments or behavior is to talk to your children, protect them from sexually violent television shows and movies, and make sure they're aware of what is and isn't appropriate.

Sexual violence goes beyond rape. Sexting or sending unwanted photos of yourself or someone else also is viewed as sexual abuse.

Additionally, in this era of social media, it's important to remind children and adults alike that we have to protect boundaries, whether it be in person or through digital media.

Make sure you're monitoring what your children do on their phones and on social media outlets. Have a conversation with them. Don't allow them to see inappropriate content. If you're watching a show that could confuse or encourage a child to act in an improper manner, rethink what you watch.

As Advocates continues to work with those who have been affected by sexual or domestic violence, we'd like Grobe to know we support his efforts. Advocates has gone through difficult times in the past three years since the news broke that two Advocates employees in Craig stole nearly $400,000 from the organization. Both women are now in jail.

Since the embezzlement case, Advocates has had a revolving door of executive directors, making it difficult for the nonprofit to focus on its mission, which is to help prevent and educate the community about sexual abuse.

We have no doubt that Advocates will thrive under Grobe's leadership. In the end, that means less crime, more advocacy and better education about sexual violence.

Editorial board

Noelle Leavitt Riley — newspaper representative

Andy Bockelman — newspaper representative

Terry Carwile — community representative

Dan Davidson — community representative