Wine tasting, Cowboy Poetry make lively events for Craig crowds at Luttrell Barn | CraigDailyPress.com

Wine tasting, Cowboy Poetry make lively events for Craig crowds at Luttrell Barn

Barry Steadman, Andy Bockelman
Spectators view A Cowboy's Legacy during the second annual Cowboy Poetry Night at the Luttrell Barn Cultural Center.
Andy Bockelman

It was a busy weekend at the Luttrell Barn Cultural Center, with more than one event celebrating the benefits of the past.

Bringing some wine culture to Moffat County, the Craig Senior Social Center hosted the Better with Age wine tasting Friday at the Luttrell Barn with the help of Bob Witham, owner of Grand Junction’s Two Rivers Winery.

“It’s our inaugural event,” said Senior Social Center Board President Lois Wymore, indicating that this will become a regular fundraising event for the organization.

Patrons enjoy their spirits on the patio during the Better with Age wine tasting at the Luttrell Barn Cultural Center.
Barry Steadman

The event featured Witham giving a presentation on each one of his wines, guiding participants on how to properly experience them. Each participant got to sample five different wines: cabernet sauvignon, merlot, syrah, tulip, and vintner’s blend.

Witham explained the types of acids in each wine, the flavors and how to properly engage all five senses when experiencing a wine. Complimentary appetizers served as palate cleansers, and those in the tasting also learned what foods pair well with different types of wines. 

Witham has been distilling wine professionally since 1998, and is a Craig native. The Senior Social Center board reached out to Witham when they were trying to establish their own staple fundraiser in the community that raises money to fund activities and programs for local senior citizens.

The Better with Age wine tasting is well-attended at the Luttrell Barn Cultural Center.
Barry Steadman

“We have exercise programs, game nights, and it’s all to keep it going,” said Judy Lewis, Senior Social Center secretary and bookkeeper.

The Senior Social Center is one of the few local organizations that does not receive funding from the city or county, leading them to rely on grants, memberships, donations, and sponsorships to fund their programs.

“It’s a donation. We’re providing the wine for free,” Witham said. “I came to do this because I’m a graduate out of Moffat County High School and so is my wife.”

Patrons have several samples to choose from during the Better with Age wine tasting at the Luttrell Barn Cultural Center.
Barry Steadman

The latter part of the evening included an art auction of 25 pieces of artwork donated by artist from the Northwest Colorado Council of the Arts. Half of the auction value of each piece of art sold went to the art council, and the rest is kept to fund the Senior Social Center.

Susie Knight introduces the act A Cowboy’s Legacy during the second annual Cowboy Poetry Night at the Luttrell Barn Cultural Center.
Andy Bockelman

While Friday was a whole-new event, Saturday night featured a returning favorite — Cowboy Poetry Night.

The evening was the second year for the show by International Western Music Association.

Randy Hoyt performs during the second annual Cowboy Poetry Night at the Luttrell Barn Cultural Center.
Andy Bockelman

Taking the stage for the night were emcee Susie Knight, while spoken word and songs were performed by Patricia Martin and Randy Hoyt and trio A Cowboy’s Legacy, touching on classic cowboy themes as well as the Western way of life in the modern era.

Donna Hatton of A Cowboy’s Legacy performs “Danny Boy” during the second annual Cowboy Poetry Night at the Luttrell Barn Cultural Center.
Andy Bockelman

The show was simulcast for spectators on the ground floor, while most of the crowd of locals and visitors were in the upper area of the barn.

Jeri Gilchrist said she traveled from Meeker for the show.

Dan Park of A Cowboy’s Legacy recites a spoken word piece during the second annual Cowboy Poetry Night at the Luttrell Barn Cultural Center.
Andy Bockelman

“I saw it advertised and thought it would be great to go,” she said. “They’re all terrific and unique in their own way. I love cowboy poetry like this.”