What’s swine is yours: Kids go hog wild at Moffat County Fair Catch-a-Pig Contest | CraigDailyPress.com
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What’s swine is yours: Kids go hog wild at Moffat County Fair Catch-a-Pig Contest

Andy Bockelman
For the Craig Press
Children between the ages of 5 and 7 years old are released to tackle a piglet during the Moffat County Fair Catch a Pig contest Thursday evening.
Andy Bockelman / For the Craig Press

Some may have spent half their life around barnyard animals, while some may never have even touched one.

But, when they all get together in the arena, all bets are off, as whoever wants it most will find a way to bring home the bacon.

And, yes, that’s quite literal.



Craig kids held nothing back Thursday night as part of the Catch-a-Pig Contest during the 103rd Moffat County Fair, with elementary and middle-schoolers alike ready to pounce on the small but feisty porkers.

“Town kids, country kids, every kid, it’s a lot of fun for all them,” said Moffat County Fair Board member Mardi Anson.

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Thane Mowdy, standing, center, hoists the piglet he caught during the Moffat County Fair Catch a Pig contest Thursday evening.
Andy Bockelman / For the Craig Press

Before the action even began, kids were waiting patiently along the fairgrounds arena fence during the PRCA/WPRA Rodeo.

Watching the events but also anticipating their turn to get down and dirty at the end of the night were brothers Esiah and Eliam Browning.

Both had been involved in Catch-a-Pig in years past, and while 7-year-old Esiah let one slip previously, Eliam, 9, was ready to again claim a pig using the tactics that won him an oinker when he was younger.

“I’m probably gonna dive on the first one I see,” Eliam said.

Likewise, by the time rodeo wrapped up, Adylee St. Martin was aching to get through the gate.

“I’ve done it about three or four times. I didn’t catch one every single time, but most of the times,” the 8-year-old said.

With piglets provided by Rick Murr, older Moffat County 4-H and FFA members along with fair volunteers oversaw the action, keeping the young swine in several small clusters for the youngest bunch of participants, aged 5 to 7.

The pigs barely stood a chance as kids swarmed them the instant the announcer cleared them, with Thane Mowdy, 7, one of the first to tackle his quarry.

Young children swarm the piglets as they participate in the Moffat County Fair Catch a Pig contest Thursday evening.
Andy Bockelman / For the Craig Press

“This is the first time I’ve caught it, but I’ve done this before,” he said.

Though some contest winners were picking out names for their new pig, Mowdy wasn’t one of them.

“I don’t really want to name him because I’m gonna eat him when he gets bigger,” he said.

While the younger children had no such rule, kids from 8 to 10 had to stay seated before getting into the fray. Still, some of them knew exactly how to pick off a pig, which were more spread out for the older age group.

Experience with ranch life in Moffat County made it a simple catch for 10-year-old Halle Broom.

“I’ve done it lots of time,” she said. “You just grab its legs and hold on.”

The oldest echelon, 11 to 13, had to lay down flat before being told to go, but they had little problem getting after the small animals.

In his last year of eligibility, 13-year-old Logan Reidhead was eager to make it count, and though a competitor beat him to the first pig he saw, he ricocheted off the boy and dove on the next pig.

“I thought I’d bounce off him and get the pig first, but I still got this one,” he said proudly. “Hopefully we’re gonna sell him or eat him.”

Snyder & Counts provided free bags of feed to all who claimed a pig — taken out of the arena in burlap sacks — with many making big plans for their new farm friends.

“You have to make sure they have a pen and food stuff and just take good care of them,” St. Martin said.


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