State college system issues report on CNCC’s Craig campus | CraigDailyPress.com

State college system issues report on CNCC’s Craig campus

Signs dot the side of Ninth Street in Craig on the way to Colorado Northwest Community College's community leader discussion Thursday, Aug. 29.
Clay Thorp/Staff

Colorado Northwestern Community College has released a follow-up report outlining its future plans after the Craig community’s recent demands for change at the college.

In a report dated Sept. 20, the Colorado Community College System lined out responses to a list of priorities presented to CNCC during a discussion with elected officials and community leaders in Craig and Moffat County at Craig’s CNCC campus Aug. 29.

The discussion was organized, in part, by State Sen. Bob Rankin and Joe Garcia, a former Colorado lieutenant governor turned CCCS chancellor.

“This is almost an historic meeting in the context of Craig and Northwestern Colorado,” Rankin said to a full CNCC library with at least 50 people in it.

In the Sept. 20 CCCS follow-up report, CCCS said it wants to show the community they’re serious about taking action.

“During the Aug. 29 convening, many of the participants expressed concern that this historic meeting of state and local leaders not just be ‘all talk and no action,’ but there needed to be built-in accountability for action,” the report reads. “In response, it is the intention of CNCC/CCCS to provide an opportunity for all participants to share reports on their respective progress on the priorities identified at the August convening on or about March 1, 2020, and to reconvene with the same state and local leaders and other participants in the Aug. 29 meeting at a date to be coordinated with all stakeholders.”

CNCC Follow-up Report 09.20.19 by Andy Bockelman on Scribd

The CCCS report directly responded to several priorities outlined by elected officials in Craig and Moffat County — one of the first of which was making Craig’s CNCC campus its own standalone campus separate from Rangely, but still a part of the community college system.

In response, CCCS said that move would leave less in the Craig campus coffers for instruction.

“As Chancellor Garcia explained at the Aug. 29 convening, the administrative overhead to operate separately would be significant and disproportionate to the overall level of revenue generated leaving much less available for instruction and student support,” the report said. “It is not our desire to see the Craig campus ‘break off’ from CNCC or leave the CCCS system of colleges. We have invested a great deal in the campus in Craig and we see it as one of the jewels among our rural college facilities, although it, like our other rural campuses, is experiencing enrollment challenges.”

Other priorities addressed by the CCCS board were the need for more student housing to attract more students, development of an artifact museum and repository for CNCC’s federal BLM fossil depository to help increase tourism and expansion and collaboration on new technologies brought about by the area’s new fiber internet being installed, among other topics.