Partial owner subject to increased property taxes | CraigDailyPress.com

Partial owner subject to increased property taxes

Collin Smith

Other action

At its Tuesday meeting, the Moffat County Commission:

• Approved a $19,820 bid from Hamill Irrigation for a self-priming pump for the Road and Bridge Department. It was the lowest bid received.

• Approved a $16,050 bid from Industrial Welding and Supply for a dump box for the Road and Bridge Department. It was the only bid received. Another company said it couldn’t bid the project because of the current volatility in steel prices.

• Delayed a public hearing for the conditional use permit of Elk Springs Recycling and Recovery until after the 14th Judicial District Court has reached a ruling on whether the facility improperly managed its waste and contaminated local water sources. No date is set for a decision, but it is expected after Aug. 27.

When Moffat County Assessor Suzanne Brinks protests the Salt River Project’s reported property value, she is doing so because she wants the county to benefit from the money it is entitled to.

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“As far as I’m concerned, it’s worth my questioning if the county as a whole will benefit from those taxes,” Brinks said.

Salt River is one of four owners of units 1 and 2 at the Tri-State Generation and Transmission power plant in Craig.

Brinks said there are some questionable reports in the Salt River property value information submitted to the county July 1.

The issues are not an isolated incident, she said. She has found problems with Salt River’s reported property values for most of the past four years.

Brinks asked the Moffat County Commission at its Tuesday meeting to allow her office to take those questions to the Colorado Board of Assessment Appeals.

She couldn’t say how much her protest might net in tax revenue, but she said those numbers would be available next week.

The commission unanimously approved following through on Brinks’ protest.

Her questions focus on ongoing construction projects that Salt River reported. A percentage of “construction work under process” can be deducted from operational income for utility companies.

The problem with Salt River’s reporting is that it has listed those projects for the past few years, Brinks said, while Tri-State has taken the same projects off of their property tax reports because they already were completed.

“Some of these projects deductions have been going on for three years,” Brinks said to the commission. “Tri-State is not taking them, and Salt River continues to.”

Brinks originally protested Salt River’s value in July to the state Division of Property Taxation, which agreed with some of Brinks’ points but not all.

The division’s ruling raised Salt River’s property value about $920,700, which equates to about $16,690 in taxes.

Salt River’s total tax bill is $1,035,891, including the division’s decision.

Brinks plans to meet with a Tri-State tax representative about her questions before appealing the division’s decision to approve some of Salt River’s tax deductions. It’s possible, she said, the two will agree on a value without the county filing an appeal.

Collin Smith can be reached at 875-1794 or cesmith@craigdailypress.com

Other action

At its Tuesday meeting, the Moffat County Commission:

• Approved a $19,820 bid from Hamill Irrigation for a self-priming pump for the Road and Bridge Department. It was the lowest bid received.

• Approved a $16,050 bid from Industrial Welding and Supply for a dump box for the Road and Bridge Department. It was the only bid received. Another company said it couldn’t bid the project because of the current volatility in steel prices.

• Delayed a public hearing for the conditional use permit of Elk Springs Recycling and Recovery until after the 14th Judicial District Court has reached a ruling on whether the facility improperly managed its waste and contaminated local water sources. No date is set for a decision, but it is expected after Aug. 27.