On the record for Moffat County Jail for July 3 | CraigDailyPress.com

On the record for Moffat County Jail for July 3

Moffat County Jail

Wednesday, July 2

Michael Eugene Burkett, 44, of Craig, was booked into Moffat County Jail on suspicion of obstructing a peace officer, resisting arrest and criminal attempt.

Craig Police Department

Tuesday, July 1

1:40 a.m. Officers responded to the 500 block of Second Avenue West for a report of theft. There was a report of a theft from a vehicle.

9:30 a.m. Officers responded to the 200 block of East Victory Way for a report of fraud.

3:10 p.m. Officers responded to the 800 block of Ashley Road for a report of harassment. There was a violation of a restraining order.

Wednesday, July 2

12:41 a.m. Officers responded to the intersection of West Sixth and Stout streets for a curfew complaint. The juvenile was released to parents.

12:42 a.m. Officers responded to the first block of West Victory Way for a complaint. A male party was taken into custody for noncompliance and booked into Moffat County Jail.

10:31 a.m. Officers responded to the intersection of Lincoln Street and East Victory Way for a report of property damage. There was a noninjury, two-car crash.

10:38 a.m. Officers responded to the intersection of Victory Way and Center Street for a report of property damage. There was a noninjury, two-car crash.

1:52 p.m. Officers responded to the 800 block of Stout Street for a follow-up investigation.

7:24 p.m. Officers responded to the intersection of East Seventh and Tucker streets for a report of a suspicious person.




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