News briefs for Dec. 17 | CraigDailyPress.com
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News briefs for Dec. 17

The Elks Lodge is hosting a New Years Eve sleepover for children ages 1 to 14 in the Elks Lodge basement beginning at 9 p.m. The fee is $10 a child, and all proceeds go to Laridan Hall. Please bring a sleeping bag, pillow, pajamas and playpens for little ones. The Elks will have movies and games and will serve a pancake breakfast from 9 to 11 a.m. Breakfast also will be served to those who don’t sleep over at $5 a plate. No sick children. Call Dora at 824-2251.

Boys and Girls Club closed until Jan. 10
The contractor scheduled to install the new gymnasium floor at the Boys and Girls Club building has encountered some delays in receiving supplies necessary for the installation.
Consequently, the scheduled completion of the gymnasium floor project is Jan. 8 instead of Friday, which has resulted in BGCC staff and executives postponing the resumption of programs and activities. The club will be closed until Jan. 10.
Ordinarily, the BGCC and other building users could work around the gym problem and use the rest of the building for programs and activities. Unfortunately, the final procedure in completing the gym floor is the application of a sealant that may emit fumes that can potentially spread beyond the gymnasium area.
The club’s staff will be at the building on a limited basis through the end of the month but will resume normal office hours Jan. 3.

BLM to draft resource management plan
The Bureau of Land Management Little Snake Field Office has scheduled three public “scoping” meetings to gather public input and ideas for the area’s resource management plan revision. The RMP provides a framework for management of BLM Lands.
The meeting schedule is:
Jan. 4, Steamboat Springs, OIympian Hall, Howelsen Hill, 845 Howelsen Parkway, from 3 to 8 p.m.
Jan. 5, Craig, Shadow Mountain Clubhouse, 1055 Moffat County Road 7, from 3 to 8 p.m.
Jan. 6, Maybell, Maybell School Gym, 30 Haynes Ave., from 6 to 9 p.m.
The meetings will be conducted in an open house format. People need not arrive at the scheduled time nor stay the duration, but they may enter and leave at their convenience during the scheduled hours.
The RMP will provide a framework for management of 1.3 million acres of BLM public land and an additional 1.1 million acres of subsurface mineral estate. The planning area includes portions of Moffat, Routt and Rio Blanco counties.
“We hope that the public will find time to attend one or more of these meetings to help us determine the major issues driving management on BLM lands in the Little Snake Field Area,” said Little Snake Field Manager John Husband.
In preparing the RMP, the BLM will consider a range of alternatives for management of activities including oil and gas, and range, natural and scenic values, and recreation management. The EIS will provide specific information about the environmental impacts of the alternative management scenarios, in accordance with federal laws such as the Federal Land Policy Management Act and the National Environmental Policy Act.
Additional information on the RMP/ElS can be found online at http://www.co.blm.gov/lsra/rmp. Or contact Jeremy Casterson at 826-5071 or Jeremy_Casterson @co.blm.gov, at the Little Snake Field Office, 455 Emerson St., Craig, CO 81625.



Prevent exposure
to carbon monoxide
State health officials are urging Coloradans to purchase and install carbon monoxide detectors in their homes to prevent exposure to the deadly gas. According to Colorado Department of Public Health statistics, 200 people die each year from carbon monoxide poisoning associated with home fuel-burning heating equipment.
Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas that is produced when any fuel is incompletely burned. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are similar to flu-like illnesses and include dizziness, fatigue, headaches, nausea and irregular breathing.
The first line of defense is to make certain that all fuel-burning appliances operate properly, but a properly working carbon monoxide detector is the second defense that can provide an early warning to consumers before gas builds up to a dangerous level.
Most devices cost less than $100. Susan Parachini, a program manager for the Department of Public Health and Environment’s Consumer Protection Division, says, “Carbon monoxide detectors are as important to home safety as smoke detectors are.” For more information, call the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Consumer Protection Division at (303) 692-3620.

Editorial Board
applicants sought
The Craig Daily Press is accepting nominations for community representatives on its Editorial Board. The community representatives would serve a four-month term beginning Jan. 1.
The Editorial Board includes two community representatives and three members of the newspaper staff. Newspaper staff members on the board are publisher Samantha Johnston, editor Andy Smith and reporter Rob Gebhart. The Editorial Board formulates the “Our View” position expressed on the Opinion page of the newspaper.
Readers interested in serving on the Editorial Board should send a letter of 500 words or fewer expressing their interest in the board to Smith at asmith @craigdailypress.com or 466 Yampa Ave., Craig, CO 81625. Letters also may be dropped off at the Daily Press office.
Call Smith at 824-7031 with questions.



FirstCall 2-1-1 is
available on weekends
FirstCall, Northern Colorado’s 2-1-1 Call Center, has expanded its hours of operation to include Saturday and Sunday, giving callers access to community information from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the weekend.
Callers can also reach a FirstCall during weekdays from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. FirstCall’s database and services are also available online 24 hours a day at http://www.firstcall211.org.
FirstCall’s mission is to enhance the lives of people in the region by providing timely, accurate and caring community resource information and referral to community members and non-profit organizations.
All calls are confidential and free of charge in Routt and Moffat Counties by dialing 2-1-1 (or 866-485-0211).

Alcoholic Anonymous lists schedule of meetings
Craig Group 1 of Alcoholics Anonymous is holding meetings at 50 S. Ranney St. The schedule: Sundays, 1 p.m., open AA meeting; Mondays, noon, Alanon; Mondays, 7 p.m., open AA men’s meeting; Tuesdays, 8 p.m., closed AA meeting; Wednesdays, noon, open women’s AA meeting; Wednesdays, 8 p.m., open meeting Big Book Study/Step Study; Thursdays, 8 p.m., AA open meeting; Fridays, 8 p.m., AA open meeting; Saturdays, 8 p.m., AA open meeting. The last Saturday of the month is an AA birthday meeting. Call 824-7320.

State transportation plan tech reports available
Fifteen technical reports that provide support documentation for Colorado’s draft 2030 Statewide Transportation Plan, “Moving Colorado: Vision for the Future,” are available for public review and comment.
The reports provide detailed information for the 2030 Statewide Transportation Plan and represent a comprehensive effort to develop a system-wide transportation vision for the state.
Hard copies of the summary plan and CDs for the Corridor Visions and Technical Reports are available at the Craig Library, 570 Green St.
Reports also can be viewed online at http://www.dot.state.co.us.


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