Miners Clinic of Colorado to offer information about federal programs | CraigDailyPress.com

Miners Clinic of Colorado to offer information about federal programs

Health screening scheduled for Thursday and Friday at The Memorial Hospital Medical Clinic

Michael Neary







— Miners who undergo screenings for possible health conditions this week also have the chance to receive information about federal programs that could help them receive treatment — if they need it.

"We do the screenings for free, and if people have evidence for either Black Lung or another qualifying condition … then we will tell them how to file," said Cecile Rose, medical director of the Miners Clinic of Colorado.

The Miners Clinic of Colorado at National Jewish Health will visit Craig on Thursday and Friday to offer free and confidential health screening exams. The Miners Clinic is working with The Memorial Hospital in Craig and providing the exams at the THM Medical Clinic on 785 Russell St.

The screening is "for current and retired miners (including coal); uranium miners, millers and ore transporters; and people who worked at or lived downwind of the Nevada Test site during nuclear weapons testing," according to an announcement from the organizations.

Rose said appointments are strongly encouraged.

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Terrie Barrie, who lives in Craig, mentioned via email several programs administered by the U.S. Department of Labor and the U.S. Department of Justice that could be of help to miners and others who have developed occupation-related conditions. Barrie is a founding member of the Alliance of Nuclear Workers Advocacy Groups.

Barrie noted the Black Lung Program for coal miners, with information that can be found at dol.gov/owcp/dcmwc/. She also listed the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act, for "claims relating to atmospheric nuclear testing and claims relating to uranium industry employment," according to the U.S. Department of Justice's website. More information about the act, is available at justice.gov/civil/common/reca.

Barrie mentioned, too, the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, designed, according to the U.S. Department of Labor's Website, for "former employees (or their survivors) of the Department of Energy, its predecessor agencies, and certain of its vendors, contractors and subcontractors … and uranium miners, millers, and ore transporters as defined by RECA Section 5," diagnosed with a variety of conditions. More information can be found at dol.gov/owcp/energy/.

Barrie, who is not connected with the Miners Clinic of Colorado, said she also could serve as a resource for information.

"I would be happy to guide anybody who needs assistance," she said in a telephone interview. She said people can call her at 970-824-2260.

Rose, with the Miners Clinic of Colorado, noted that the sorts of criteria for federal help can vary from condition to condition — something that makes help and support vital in moving through the application processes.

"We'll say, 'Here's what you need to do next,'" Rose said. And when people do qualify, she added, "We'll write a letter of support on behalf of their claim."

People seeking more information about the health screenings, or who want to make an appointment, can call the Miners Clinic of Colorado at 877-255-5864.

Contact Michael Neary at 970-875-1794 or mneary@CraigDailyPress.com or follow him on Twitter @CDP_Education.