Man shot in Hayden on Friday night later arrested | CraigDailyPress.com

Man shot in Hayden on Friday night later arrested

Matt Stensland

— A man who was shot in the leg Friday night in Hayden was later arrested on suspicion of third-degree assault.

Hayden Police Chief Greg Tuliszewski said officers were dispatched shortly after 10 p.m. to a report of a disturbance involving two males in the alley behind a restaurant at 107 W. Jefferson Ave.

According to a news release from Hayden Police Department: “Upon arrival officers determined that a disturbance had occurred between two male parties over the arrestee ‘pounding’ and hitting a pickup truck parked in the alley. The truck belonged to the other male party (age 50) in this incident. In the argument that followed, one male party shot the other striking him in the leg. The investigation to this point does not indicate that either party knew each other prior to this incident.”

Derek J. Stephenson, 31, was found shot in the upper leg and was treated for injuries at Yampa Valley Medical Center before being booked into Routt County Jail. The name of the man who fired the shot was not immediately available.

Tuliszewski said they are not looking for any other suspects involved in the incident. The shooting still is under investigation, and more details should be available Monday.

The District Attorney’s Office and the Routt County Sheriff’s Office were helping with the investigation.

To reach Matt Stensland, call 970-871-4247, email mstensland@SteamboatToday.com or follow him on Twitter @SBTStensland




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