Health Briefs: Unclaimed Storage Treasures and Community Bazaar July 15 | CraigDailyPress.com

Health Briefs: Unclaimed Storage Treasures and Community Bazaar July 15

Think Storage Wars Craig-style: A fund raising event for Yampa Valley Pregnancy & Family Center will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 15 at  Big Bar Storage on Stock Drive at Lincoln Avenue. Locks on the storage unit(s) will be cut at 9 a.m., large items will be put out for a silent auction, smaller items will go on the bazaar tables for sale. Shoppers will also have the opportunity to buy 50/50 Raffle ticket with the drawing at 1:30 p.m., Or take a turn at the Car Smash Booth and be sure to get a Law Dog before you head home. For more information call 970-824-5204 or email yvpc@rocketmail.com.

How Do I Protect Myself from UV Rays?

People who get a lot of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays are at greater risk for skin cancer.

Sunlight is the main source of UV rays, but you don't have to avoid the sun completely. And it would be unwise to stay inside if it would keep you from being active, because physical activity is important for good health. But getting too much sun can be harmful. Some people think about sun protection only when they spend a day at the lake, beach, or pool. But sun exposure adds up day after day, and it happens every time you are in the sun.

The American Cancer Society offers steps you can take to limit your exposure to UV rays. Simply staying in the shade is one of the best ways to limit your UV exposure. If you are going to be in the sun, "Slip! Slop! Slap!® and Wrap" is a catchphrase that can help you remember some of the key steps you can take to protect yourself from UV rays:

• Slip on a shirt.

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• Slop on sunscreen.

• Slap on a hat.

• Wrap on sunglasses to protect the eyes and skin around them.

For more helpful tips visit: http://www.cancer.org/cancer/skin-cancer/prevention-and-early-detection/uv-protection.html.

Menopause: Tips for a Healthy Transition

During the menopause transition, women may notice troublesome symptoms like hot flashes or trouble sleeping. Risk for heart disease and osteoporosis increase during this time, as well. The National Institute on Aging offers five tips to help:

Quit smoking or using tobacco.

Eat a healthy diet, low in fat, high in fiber, with plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole-grain foods.

Make sure you get enough calcium and vitamin D.

Learn what your healthy weight is, and try to stay there.

Do weight-bearing exercise, such as climbing stairs or dancing, at least three days each week for healthy bones. Try to be physically active in other ways for your general health.

Remember that menopause is not a disease that has to be treated, but doctors can help talk about staying healthy and controlling bothersome symptoms like hot flashes.

Deaths from Cancer Higher in Rural America

The cancer gap between rural and urban Americans continues to grow in the United States, according to a new report from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. The study shows that cancer death rates are falling more slowly in rural areas than in urban areas, but proven strategies can help reduce these disparities.

The report is the first comprehensive description of cancer incidence and deaths in rural and urban areas.

While rural areas have lower rates of new cases of cancer (incidence rates) than urban areas, they have higher cancer death rates. Incidence rates were higher in rural areas for several cancers, including those linked to tobacco use such as lung cancer, and those that can be prevented by screening such as colorectal and cervical cancers.

To reduce these gaps, health care providers in rural areas can:

• Encourage patients to make healthy choices that lower cancer risk, such as quitting smoking, avoiding secondhand smoke, protecting skin from the sun when outdoors, staying physically active, and eating healthy foods.

• Recommend cancer screening tests and vaccinations that can prevent cancer.

• Participate in comprehensive cancer control coalitions.

The complete report is available at:

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/ss/ss6614a1.htm?s_cid=govD_cancer_rural_urban_01

Wellness Wednesday lunch and speaker schedule for July

Wellness Wednesday offers fitness classes, wellness checks with a nurse, activities, lunch and guest speakers for older adults. It's held every Wednesday at St. Michael's Catholic Church. For more information visit northwestcoloradohealth.org/agingwell or call 970-871-7676.

July 5

Tuna roll up, salad, cookie

Becky Field, vocalist (pending)

July 12

Ham pasta salad, 3 bean salad, roll, pineapple upside down cake

Christina Oxley, Craig Chamber of Commerce

July 19

No Wellness Wednesday

July 26

Pizza, salad, dessert

Lynn Cox, Northwest Colorado Health Dental Clinic

Learn how to protect you and your loved ones during a thunderstorm

The weather forecast calls for a slight chance of thunderstorms, but you can only see a few fluffy white clouds overhead. So you and your tennis partner grab your racquets and balls and head for the tennis court. You spend a few minutes warming up and then—wait! Is that thunder you hear? Was that a lightning flash?

What do you do? Keep playing until the thunder and lightning get closer? Go sit on the metal bench under the trees to see what happens? Or get in your car and drive home?

Correct answer: If no substantial, non-concrete shelter is nearby, get in your car and wait out the storm. Why? Because being outside when lightning is present is not something to take lightly—ever.

To learn more, visit CDC's National Center for Environmental Health's "Your Health — Your Environment" blog.