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Gubernatorial candidate Hickenlooper visits Craig

Denver Mayor and gubernatorial candidate John Hickenlooper, left, shakes hands with Craig Mayor Don Jones before speaking to a crowd of local residents Monday at the Center of Craig. Hickenlooper will also speak at today’s Rotary Club meeting at 7 a.m. at the Golden Cavvy, 538 Yampa Ave.
Shawn McHugh

If you go

What: Craig Rotary Club meeting featuring John Hickenlooper

When: 7 a.m. today

Where: Golden Cavvy, 538 Yampa Ave.

— The meeting is open to the public. For more information, call Randy Looper at 826-4444.





Denver Mayor and gubernatorial candidate John Hickenlooper, left, shakes hands with Craig Mayor Don Jones before speaking to a crowd of local residents Monday at the Center of Craig. Hickenlooper will also speak at today’s Rotary Club meeting at 7 a.m. at the Golden Cavvy, 538 Yampa Ave.
Shawn McHugh

If you go

What: Craig Rotary Club meeting featuring John Hickenlooper

When: 7 a.m. today

Where: Golden Cavvy, 538 Yampa Ave.



— The meeting is open to the public. For more information, call Randy Looper at 826-4444.

Rose Hutton visited the Center of Craig on Monday night for a meet-and-greet with Democratic gubernatorial candidate John Hickenlooper.

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By the end of the event, Hutton said she was seriously considering voting for the candidate.

“I think it was the fact that he is very open-minded,” she said. “You know, I haven’t heard any of the other candidates coming to Craig or making a speech, as far as I know.

“But, just the fact that somebody who is (running) for governor comes to Craig, I think it made a lot of people happy.”

The visit began with a speech from the Denver mayor, and moved into questions from the audience of about 50 residents.

Hickenlooper started his presentation by addressing his background and what he thought voters were looking for in their governor.

“People are fearful and anxious about the economy and their jobs,” he said. “People are angry at the government, they’re not sure who they are angry at, but they are tired of someone not doing something to turn things around.

“I guess the reason that I am running for governor is that I believe that I can turn the state around faster than anybody else.”

Hickenlooper said he has three traits that would make him a good governor — his work ethic, fiscal responsibility and that he is “relentlessly cooperative.”

“If we are going to work our way out of this, we are going to have to really focus on the collaborative and coming together,” he said.

Hickenlooper said he thinks state government needs to be smaller.

“In that process of making it smaller and more effective, you have to really manage it,” he said. “You can’t just cut budgets. You have to manage it so that it will be more effective.”

He then addressed how he would seek to manage the state.

“Everyone is going top-down with study groups and economic development plans,” he said. “Why don’t we do it bottom-up? Why don’t we go to all 64 counties and … (get) everybody involved in trying to work out ‘what do we want in our county?’”

After Hickenlooper spoke to the crowd, he fielded

questions from the audience, several of which concerned the energy industry.

“I love the clean energy economy,” he said. “It’s a wonderful vision. I believe it will leave a remarkable legacy for Bill Ritter, but it is going to take a long time to get there, like 10, 15 or 30 years.”

Hickenlooper said natural gas is the “perfect transition fuel” into a greener energy economy.

“We have to hold ourselves to accountability and make sure we don’t ruin the beauty of our lands, but I think we should drill as much as we can,” he said.

He said the state should work to find a more stable natural gas price “so we don’t have this boom-bust that affects everybody.”

Hickenlooper also fielded several questions about the coal industry and the recent passing of Colorado House Bill 10-1365, also known as the Clean Air, Clean Jobs Act.

One audience member asked Hickenlooper how he would treat smaller communities impacted by coal.

“I can’t go to every county … but what I can say is that I would make sure my door was always open,” he said.

Hickenlooper said he thinks every community should “have the right to determine its’ own future.”

Hickenlooper also addressed clean coal technology.

“Coal is so plentiful and so inexpensive, my guess is that they will find a way to make it cleaner,” he said.

“I don’t know if it will ever get to the true, clean coal, but that’s the goal.”

Hickenlooper is also scheduled to speak today at 7 a.m. during the Craig Rotary Club’s meeting at the Golden Cavvy, 538 Yampa Ave.

The meeting is open to the public.


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