‘Give until you can’t give no more’ | CraigDailyPress.com

‘Give until you can’t give no more’

Steve Ivers named Volunteer of the Year

John Vandelinder

— Steve Ivers was diagnosed with lung cancer in the summer of 2006.

The disease “scared the heck out of me at first,” he says. “But now, I’m too busy for it. I’ve just got to go. I don’t have time for cancer with my schedule.”

You’ll have to excuse Steve if he doesn’t want to dwell on what ails him. He’s interested in making himself, and others, feel good.

“Every time I get a kid to smile,” he says, “it makes me feel like a million bucks. You might as well give until you can’t give no more.”

This is why the Boys & Girl’s Club of Craig is awarding Steve with the Georgina McAnally Volunteer of the Year award at tonight’s Cowboy Christmas fundraiser.

“Steve is widely known for his ongoing community service,” Boys & Girls Club Executive Director Dana Duran said. “He’s always putting others – especially the youths of Craig – before himself.”

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When Steve was diagnosed, he said it had a crippling effect on his body and his mind.

He had spent his entire life in Craig. He graduated from Moffat County High School in 1988, and has played just about every sport he had time for.

He coached his son and daughter’s athletic teams, and he yearned to be on the sideline teaching children their chosen sport.

Then the diagnose came.

At first, doctors and disease had limited what he was able to do.

“I didn’t want to do anything or even get out of bed,” he said. “But, I missed being on the field and seeing the kids that I coach smile. It got me out of bed. Coaching and being around the kids helps get me away from cancer.”

So, Steve dedicates most of his time to Craig youths, showing them how to dribble, catch a baseball or make a tackle.

He credits his wife, Holly, of whom he says “without her I couldn’t be volunteer. She accepts everything that I do.”

He’s seen the change in the generations of children around town, and he aims to do all he can to help mold them.

“Struggling kids can play sports and get away from the problems they may face day in and day out,” he said. “You feel a great sense of pride when you get a chance to watch all the little guys having fun. Win or lose, they have a smile on their faces. At the end of the day, I’m smiling because of them.”