From Pipi’s Pasture: A note on a napkin | CraigDailyPress.com

From Pipi’s Pasture: A note on a napkin

Diane Prather

Diane Prather

For some years now, our family members have been leaving notes to one another on the dining room table, usually on the placemat where that person sits at mealtime. This note-leaving activity became more important after our sons and their families moved away from Craig.

For example, assume that a family member is headed for Craig. I'm working away from home, and so the note left on the table might read, "There's a casserole on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator. Help yourself."

(I must admit that I sometimes get carried away with my notes where food is concerned, including information about where sandwich-making stuff can be found, for example, when our family members know perfectly well where everything is located.)

Or I might leave a note something like this: "I won't be home until 3 p.m. If you get here before then, could you please check the cow in the corral? I think she might calve."

Husband Lyle sometimes gets into the notes, too, leaving messages such as, "I've gone to Craig for tractor parts. I may need to go to Steamboat."

Most people leave notes on paper from note pads or on scraps of paper. Not us. Most of the time our notes are written on paper napkins; handy because they're right there in the basket on the dining room table. It's easier than trying to find a piece of paper from the stack of my stuff on the table. Not that it's easy to write on paper napkins. The paper tears easily, and the embossed design on the napkin makes the writing a bumpy job, indeed. The writing requires a roller kind of pen with a fluid type of ink, which isn't a problem at our house; several pens can be found on the table most anytime.

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Our 21-year-old grandson, Kenny, has gotten into writing notes on napkins, especially at night. It's usually late when he gets here Friday nights or late after spending time with his friends. So if he wants to let us know something, he grabs a napkin, and the next morning I find the note on my placemat. Last week, when he was here to hunt elk, I found the following note, printed perfectly, in block form on one side of a white napkin.

“Grandma,

Wake me up to help you with chores. It was -3 degrees when I got home, so I'll help you so you aren't out in the cold so long. I don't think I'm going hunting tomorrow due to the fact that if I were to get something, I wouldn't get out of town until late.”

— Kenny

It doesn't matter that the note was written on a napkin. What matters is that it was left by a caring grandson. On this weekend before Thanksgiving, I'm thinking about how thankful I am to have such a wonderful family. Happy Thanksgiving, everyone.