Flu season ramping up in Northwest Colorado | CraigDailyPress.com
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Flu season ramping up in Northwest Colorado

The Centers for Disease Control recommends only injectable flu vaccines this season, not nasal flu mists.
Courtesy Photo

As the winter flu season intensifies, local medical providers are telling residents it’s not too late to get a flu vaccine.

While many flu shot clinics are typically held in the fall, early January is still a good time to get a shot to protect against flu for the remainder of flu season.

This year’s three-component flu vaccine protects against a 2009 H1N1-like and a 2014 H3N2-like type A viruses and a 2008-like B virus.

Four-component vaccines also protect against a 2013-like B virus.

Type B viruses typically peak in February, though he acknowledged the peak of flu season in general is different each year.

This year, the Centers for Disease Control recommendsrecommends only injectable vaccines rather than a nasal spray vaccine, citing a lack of evidence supporting the flu mist’s effectiveness during the 2016-17 flu season. only injectable vaccines rather than a nasal spray vaccine, citing a lack of evidence supporting the flu mist’s effectiveness during the 2016-17 flu season.

recommends only injectable vaccines rather than a nasal spray vaccine, citing a lack of evidence supporting the flu mist’s effectiveness during the 2016-17 flu season.

Beth Watson, a public health nurse at Northwest Colorado Health, noted there is still time to receive a flu shot at outlets such as NCH.

“If one does get sick, flu vaccination may make the illness milder and reduce the number of work days or school days missed due to illness,” she said.

Watson said while flu activity is typically highest from December to February, cases can stretch into May in some years.

For those who do come down with the flu, Watson advised that it’s a wise idea to seek medical advice and anti-viral medication to help ease flu symptoms.

“Call your health care provider if you develop symptoms,” Watson said. “Don’t just tough it out.”

A change this year is that the Centers for Disease Control has relaxed its recommendations for whether people with egg allergies can get a flu vaccine.

People with egg allergies who have reacted with the hives in the past are now recommended to get a flu vaccine, and those who’ve experienced more severe egg allergy reactions could also get the vaccine, but should check with their doctor for details.

To make an appointment at Northwest Colorado Health, call 970-879-1632. Costs vary, and low cost options are available to those without insurance.

To reach Teresa Ristow, call 970-871-4206, email To reach Teresa Ristow, call 970-871-4206, email tristow@SteamboatToday.com or follow her on Twitter @TeresaRistowTo reach Teresa Ristow, call 970-871-4206, email tristow@SteamboatToday.com or follow her on Twitter @TeresaRistow


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