Eveline and Eric Bacon: Bringing home the Bacons | CraigDailyPress.com

Eveline and Eric Bacon: Bringing home the Bacons

Lauren Blair

Eveline and Eric Bacon are a quiet couple, but the pair offers a wealth of interesting history, stories and passions. Here, Eveline poses with her Naturalization Certificate, which certifies her as a U.S. citizen. "I’m passionate about this country and about the people in this country," Eveline said. Next to her, Eric shows off his mass multiplayer online reality game, "Stalkersoup." It has been three years in the making, with two million viewers in three different languages, with a proposed launch coming this year.





Eveline and Eric Bacon are a quiet couple, but the pair offers a wealth of interesting history, stories and passions. Here, Eveline poses with her Naturalization Certificate, which certifies her as a U.S. citizen. “I'm passionate about this country and about the people in this country,” Eveline said. Next to her, Eric shows off his mass multiplayer online reality game, “Stalkersoup.” It has been three years in the making, with two million viewers in three different languages, with a proposed launch coming this year.
Lauren Blair

One of Craig's most unusual pairs keeps a pretty low profile. On their own time, they enjoy being home together with their cats, but the stories, passions and talents of Eveline and Eric Bacon make them stand out in a crowd.

Eveline is Brazilian, with long dark hair and distinctively beautiful features. She works as a care coordinator for Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association, often putting her Spanish language skills to good use in helping to coordinate patient care with specialists.

At 6' 2", with a quiet demeanor but one that indicates that this is not a guy you want to mess with, Eric is a Vietnam veteran, a product development consultant for some big-name companies, and a computer-gaming genius.

For the last three years, Eric has been holed up in his basement designing a mass multiplayer online reality game called “Stalkersoup.” The game is akin to “World of Warcraft” but uses real world graphics instead of what's called flat space graphics.

"Mine is an actual world," Eric explained. "You walk on it and interact with everything in it. And I've brought it up to a level that rivals any new game out there."

Recommended Stories For You

The game is still in beta, meaning it hasn't been officially advertised or released yet. Despite its relative infancy, Eric said the game has drawn over two million views and is being actively translated by gamers in Japan, Ukraine and Brazil.

"It went viral," Eric said. "When I actually shared it with people, the website crashed because so many people wanted to download the game."

Now in its fourth year of development, Eric is planning to release the game soon.

"My release is not set yet because it's all based on how I evolve this last section of this initial release," Eric said. "It's a lot like writing a book. Now it's poised to be introduced on a regular basis to be like chapters in that book."

Eric comes from a family of talented artists, with his grandfather, Irving Bacon, being the fifth most prolific actor in U.S. history, according to Eric. The younger Bacon was a child actor himself, playing a cadet in Captain Satellite from 1959 to 1962. He is also a one-degree connection to another world-famous Bacon.

An engineer by training, Eric said he got his start working with digital technology in the Army in 1972 as a high-speed digital communications expert.

"My scores were so high they let me pick anything that I wanted," Eric said. "It turned out to be pretty cool. I got to go all over the world installing systems for automatic digital switching networks. It was super advanced for the time. We could send a message from the White House or Pentagon anywhere in the world in two seconds."

The experience turned out to serve him well, launching him into a career working with large media and technology companies, including Intel, Motorola, Boeing and MTV. It was the latter that brought him to Sao Paulo, Brazil in 1994 where he met Eveline.

The two met at a club when Eric was reluctantly hanging out with some business partners. He happened to be in the market for an English speaker to create prompts for a phone call-in system for MTV.

Eveline had recently finished her teaching degree and was teaching English as a second language. The group staying out dancing all night in typical Brazilian fashion, followed up by breakfast in the morning.

The two eventually got together (and Eveline's voice could be heard all across Brazil whenever anyone called in to request a song), living in Brazil for a short time before moving back to the United States.

"We went crazy. MTV was sort of a fun thing," Eveline said. "We met a lot of bands with MTV, so we had a lot of backstage experiences like the Rolling Stones."

The two got married in 1997, moving from Florida to Hawaii and then eventually back to Brazil in 2000. Sickness and national tensions drove them back to the States once again, however.

"He got bit by a mosquito and got dengue fever," Eveline said. "He almost died, it was terrible…Then when 9/11 happened, it was terrible because people were burning American flags."

The couple high-tailed it back to Florida, where they picked Colorado to make their new home. After a couple of years in Denver, Eveline found a job as program manager with Communidad Integrada, which at the time had an office in Craig.

After two years with the organization, it downsized, and Eveline accepted a new job with the VNA.

"My background was in education," Eveline said. "I just made the move to health education, which is another passion of mine."

Now the couple owns their own home in Craig, complete with three cats. They recently moved Eric's mother, now 90 years old, to Craig to help take care of her.

"We like to watch movies, we like to cook and eat good food and drink good wine," Eveline said. "And that's pretty much it. We do like to stay home a lot."

After so many adventures around the world, the quiet, small-town lifestyle suits both of them well.

"I like the country," Eric said. "I don't like the city anymore. I like it out here, nice and calm."

Contact Lauren Blair at 970-875-1794 or lblair@CraigDailyPress.com.