Craig Middle School grapplers finish 3rd in Hayden | CraigDailyPress.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Craig Middle School grapplers finish 3rd in Hayden

Ben Bulkeley
Craig Middle School wrestler Ashlee Griffiths, top, tries to pin Hayden’s Tommy Bertram on Saturday. Griffiths, who wrestles in the 85-pound class, won all of her matches by pin to take first in her weight class.
Ben Bulkeley

Standings

Team standings from the March 6 Northwest Invitational Wrestling Tournament in Hayden:

Team Place

Meeker 1st

Hayden 2nd

Craig 3rd

Rangely 4th

East Grand 5th

Individual placers

Individual placers at the March 6 Northwest Invitational Wrestling Tournament in Hayden:

Weight Name Place

80 pounds Kelsey Coates 2nd

85 pounds Ashlee Griffiths 1st

95 pounds Trent Vernon 3rd

110 pounds Casey Barnes 3rd

115 pounds Danny Wilbur 4th

120 pounds Brayden Peterson 1st

130 pounds Curtis Dunlap 3rd

135 pounds Jory Coates 3rd

135 pounds Dan Rockwell 4th

Heavyweight Bob Meyers 1st





Craig Middle School wrestler Ashlee Griffiths, top, tries to pin Hayden’s Tommy Bertram on Saturday. Griffiths, who wrestles in the 85-pound class, won all of her matches by pin to take first in her weight class.
Ben Bulkeley

Curtis Dunlap, top, grapples with Hayden’s Taylor Lewis. Overall, Craig Middle School finished third in the Northwest Invitational wrestling tournament Saturday in Hayden, behind first-place Meeker and second-place Hayden.Ben Bulkeley

For Ashlee Griffiths, pinning three opponents in a row was all in a day’s work at the March 6 Northwest Invitational Wrestling Tournament in Hay­den.

The Craig Middle School grappler was unmatched in the 85-pound class, as she won her weight class.

“I thought I had a pretty good day,” she said. “I didn’t really have any trouble with anyone.”



Griffiths, one of two girls on the team, was able to pin all of her opponents in the first round.

“All of my matches were pretty good,” she said. “I pinned everyone I faced.”

Participate in The Longevity Project

The Longevity Project is an annual campaign to help educate readers about what it takes to live a long, fulfilling life in our valley. This year Kevin shares his story of hope and celebration of life with his presentation Cracked, Not Broken as we explore the critical and relevant topic of mental health.



Griffiths wasn’t the only Bulldog to have success at the eight-team tournament.

Overall, the Bulldogs finished third, behind first-place Meeker and second-place Hayden.

CMS fielded three overall winners, as Griffiths, Brayden Peterson (120-pound class), and Bob Meyers (heavyweight) won all their matches to take home first-place medals.

Peterson was able to dominate his way through six rounds to claim the first spot.

“It went pretty good,” he said. “It was a long day, though.”

Peterson, who was seeded first in the tournament, had a battle on his hands when he faced second-seeded Leo Bravo, of East Grand, to claim first.

But most of his opponents weren’t able to keep up.

“They weren’t too bad,” he said. “The last match was pretty tough, but the others weren’t as bad.”

Other individual placers incl­uded Kelsey Coates, who finished second in the 80-pound class; Trent Vernon, who finished third in the 95-pound class; Casey Barnes, who finished third in the 110-pound class; Danny Wilbur, who finished fourth in the 115-pound class; Curtis Dunlap, who finished third in the 130-pound class; Jory Coates, who finished third in the 135-pound class; and Dan Rockwell, who finished fourth in the 135-pound class.

Meyers, the Bulldogs’ heavyweight entrant, was able to pin all of his opponents to pick up a first-place finish.

In his first match, the second-seeded Meyers defeated Steamboat Springs’ Brandon Yeager, who was seeded seventh.

In his second match, Meyers defeated North Park’s Adrian Cereceres to set up a championship match with Steamboat Springs’ Cole Sittig.

“My first two matches were kind of easy,” he said. “The last one was a little harder.”

Sittig, who was seeded first, matched Meyer’s strength with speed, but the Bulldog proved to be too strong.

And, a win coming at the hands of a rival made the first-place trophy even sweeter, Meyers said.

“It definitely feels good,” he said. “It was a sweet day.”


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Craig and Moffat County make the Craig Press’ work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.