Craig health briefs for Nov. 1, 2014: Grief support group offers help for getting through holidays | CraigDailyPress.com

Craig health briefs for Nov. 1, 2014: Grief support group offers help for getting through holidays

Craig Daily Press Staff Report

Jeff Chilson

Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association's Hospice program will offer a "Getting through the Holidays" Grief Support and Education Group from 6:30-7:30pm on Tuesday at the Colorado Northwestern Community College Academic Building, Room 114.

This group is open to anyone in the community who has lost a loved one. For more information or to sign up, please contact Sandy Beran at 970-871-7682.

The Memorial Hospital selects new CFO

The Memorial Hospital Board of Trustees announced this week that Jeff Chilson will become the chief financial officer for TMH.

“Jeff has a very strong background in hospital finance and as a hospital CFO,” said TMH Chief Executive Officer John Rossfeld. “His experience in large and small hospitals as well as both non-profit and for-profit organizations will bring a unique skill set to help us take TMH to the next level for both financial and operational excellence. He is excited to come here and he will be a great asset for the organization, the executive team and the board.”

Chilson said he is excited to join the Craig hospital.

“The reason I accepted the position was for the opportunity to work with a great management team who work together collaboratively,” he said. “The hospital is beautiful and a wonderful facility to care for the health of the community. Everyone who I met both at the hospital and out in the community was warm and friendly. My wife and I are looking forward to becoming part of the Craig community.”

Recommended Stories For You

Most recently, Chilson was the CFO for Westfield Hospital in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Prior to that he was the director of cash management with Duke University Health System in Durham, North Carolina.

Chilson’s first day at TMH will be November 17.

TMH Medical Clinic to host open house

The Memorial Hospital will host an open house at from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at TMH Medical Clinic, 785 Russell St.

The community is invited to meet new physician assistant Maggie Anderson and new cardiologist Dr. Gerald Myers, who is joining TMH after several years serving the area through Heart Center of the Rockies.

People are also invited to tour the new walk-in clinic space and the lab that opened late last year.

Refreshments will be served.

For more information, call 970-826-2400.

Agency provides guidance on enrolling in Medicare

The open enrollment period for Medicare began in October, and the nonprofit National Council on Aging created an online resource known as My Medicare Matters to help baby boomers avoid common mistakes when enrolling.

The resource helps people evaluate their individual needs, compare their options, enroll in a plan and sustain the best coverage for years to come.

According to a press release from NCOA, common errors include signing up too early or too late for Medicare and its parts, not understanding the difference between a Medicare Supplement and a Medicare Advantage policy, not applying for extra help and not re-evaluating your coverage every year.

For more information, visit MyMedicareMatters.org.

Untreated strep throat in children can lead to serious illness

A newly identified disorder known as Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococci and Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndromes can be triggered by infections such as strep throat, walking pneumonia, viruses and Lyme disease, according to a press release from the PANDAS Network.

PANDAS-PANS is an autoimmune reaction which can result in inflammation of a child's brain. The inflammation can cause a variety of serious symptoms such as sudden onset of OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), severely restrictive food intake, anxiety, depression, tics, neurological conditions, sleep disturbances, and a host of other psychiatric behaviors.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 2 million children could be affected by this newly identified disorder. The average age of onset is between 4 and 7, but can occur anytime throughout childhood, according to the release.

"A simple course of antibiotics can stop symptoms of this disorder," the organization said in the press release.