Craig briefs: Young professionals network to meet today | CraigDailyPress.com

Craig briefs: Young professionals network to meet today

— The Yampa Valley Young Professionals will have its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. tonight at the Clarion Inn, in the Craig Room.

Round table group to talk civic participation

Join Moffat County Sheriff K.C. Hume at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Bell Tower in room 201 for an informal round table discussion on how to have a voice in the precinct, county and beyond.

GOP Lincoln Day Dinner set for 6:30 p.m. Friday

The GOP will host its 2016 Lincoln Day Dinner at 6:30 p.m. Friday at the Moffat County Fairgrounds Pavilion, featuring guest speaker Ben Collins. State Party Chairman Steve House will also attend.

According to a news release, Collins is a decorated U.S. Army Special Forces veteran (Green Beret) who completed multiple combat rotations in support of the Global War on Terrorism. As an expert on national security and foreign policy matters, Collins is a regular guest on FOX News, as well as a frequent radio show expert on U.S. radio stations from Arizona to New York City and the BBC World Service.

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To purchase tickets for $53 or for more information, call 970-629-9762.

Business association to host Valentine's dance

The Downtown Business Association is hosting a Valentine's dance from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday on the upper level of the Center of Craig. The dance is free and will take place during Taste of Chocolate/Art Walk. Live music and dancing is on the roster. Call Noelle Leavitt Riley at 970-756-1308, with questions

Park seeks comment on exotic goat removal

According to a news release, the National Park Service is seeking public input on a draft management plan to restrict or remove exotic Rocky Mountain goats in Dinosaur National Monument.

The first documented mountain goat sighting in Dinosaur National Monument was in June 2014 at the end of Harpers Corner Road near the Colorado-Utah line. It was spotted on several more occasions in this area during the summer of 2014 and then again in June 2015. The mountain goat is believed to have originated from Utah's Leidy Peak herd, approximately 50 miles west of the monument. While native to the Northern Rockies, mountain goats were purposefully introduced into previously unoccupied mountain ranges for hunting and general recreation and enjoyment by both Colorado and Utah state wildlife agencies. Mountain goats are considered by NPS policy to be a non-native species and require proactive management action to protect sensitive and/or endemic plant and animal communities.

Though the risk may be small, mountain goats have the potential to transmit disease, such as pneumonia and Johne's disease, to other native species, such as native bighorn sheep, deer, pronghorn and elk. Mountain goat dispersal and range expansion have created concerns for the National Park Service at Olympic, Grand Teton, Yellowstone, and Rocky Mountain national parks, where mountain goats have traveled from introduced populations. Mountain goats are considered non-native/exotic at these parks, also.

In consultation with Utah and Colorado state wildlife agencies, the National Park Service has developed procedures to remove mountain goats including both live capture and lethal removal methods. Methods selected depend on variables including the goat's location, visitor and staff safety, risk of escape before capture, availability of a relocation site and staff availability.

Comments can be submitted online at the NPS Planning, Environment and Public Comment website at parkplan

ning.nps.gov/dinomtngoat, or by mail to Natural Resource Specialist, Dinosaur National Monument, 4545 E. U.S. Highway 40, Dinosaur, Colorado 81610.

Comments must be submitted by March 9.


Wildlife zones to remain on Colorado corridors

According to a news release, the Colorado Department of Transportation traffic met with local law enforcement in Rio Blanco, Moffat and Garfield counties and Colorado State Patrol and will keep several wildlife zones intact on Colorado Highway 13, U.S. Highway 40 and Colorado Highway 82. Moving forward, the zones will maintain the fines doubled signage but eliminate the nighttime speed limits in the two zones that have them, stated the news release.

The following zones are being maintained.

■ Colo. 13 mile point 28 to 38.81.

■ Colo. 13 mile point 58 to 68.

■ Colo. 13 mile point 68 to 88.

■ U.S. 40 mile point 93 to 103.

■ Colo. 82 mile point 31 to 36.

CDOT announces snow plow monitoring system

The Colorado Department of Transportation on Sunday announced a new snow plow monitoring system, which provides near real-time location information for CDOT's snow plow fleet.

In addition to allowing CDOT to more efficiently deploy its fleet during winter storms, the Automated Vehicle Locator system allows for the public to go online and see which areas have been plowed.

The public can view snow plow locations on the any device by clicking otrip.org/snowplow.htm#/snowplow (also see upper right hand corner of cotrip.org menu). Using this information, drivers will be able to see plows' current locations, their travel speed and direction they are traveling.

In addition to helping the public observe plow locations, the AVL system also generates real-time notifications to CDOT on how the plow is functioning. This will make it easier for CDOT crews to manage the fleet, direct plows to the areas where they are needed most and keep more plows on the road by addressing mechanical issues as quickly as possible.