Craig briefs: VNA warns of animal diseases this spring | CraigDailyPress.com

Craig briefs: VNA warns of animal diseases this spring

Hantavirus is a serious respiratory disease carried by deer mice (brown on top and white underneath, with large ears), according to a press release from the Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association.

Be careful when doing spring cleaning and before opening up cabins, buildings, sheds and barns. You can become infected when you inhale dirt and dust contaminated with deer mice droppings.

Air out rodent-infested buildings or areas at least 30 minutes before cleaning. Use a solution of household bleach (one cup bleach per gallon of water) to spray materials you have used for cleaning mouse droppings.

For more information visit http://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus.

Bats, fox, porcupines and other small rodents can have rabies. Never touch these animals. Did you know:

■ Rabies is a deadly disease transmitted through the saliva of an infected animal, usually from bites.

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■ Not all bats have rabies, but most human cases in the United States are caused by bats.

■ Bat bites leave a small wound but require urgent medical attention. If bitten, wash the wound with soap and water and call your

doctor.

For more information, visit http://www.cdc.gov/rabies.

Rock scaling operations to cause delays on I-70

Crews successfully have moved both westbound and eastbound traffic onto the detours that will be in place for the duration of construction of the westbound Twin Tunnels project, through December 2014, according to the Colorado Department of Transportation.

Now that traffic is traveling on the detour routes, crews have begun rock-scaling efforts. The work began Monday and will continue throughout the remainder of the week and into next week.

Rock scaling will begin at 7 a.m. and continue until 6 p.m. During this time, traffic will be stopped in both directions for a period of 30 minutes while crews perform the rock scaling.

For more information, call 303-327-4034 or visit http://www.coloradodot.info/projects/i70twintunnels.

Discuss alcohol with your teens this spring

With prom and graduation approaching fast, Grand Futures Prevention Coalition wants to extend a helping hand to parents during this important, yet chaotic time, according to a press release.

Grand Futures will promote a Parent Education Campaign that highlights helpful and important information for parents about the importance of talking to their teens about underage drinking and other drug use. The campaign also stresses other ways to keep kids drug-free, such as modeling good behavior, locking up alcohol or drugs in the home and connecting kids with alternative activities, such as after-school programs.

Parents can visit the Grand Futures website at

http://www.grandfutures.org or connect directly with the Speak Now campaign at http://www.speaknowcolorado.org.

Fire Board elections to take place in May

The Craig Fire/Rescue Board elections are coming up in May and will determine which candidates will run the board.

Four people are running for three four-year terms, and one candidate, Rodney Kowach, is running uncontested for a two-year term.

John Forgay, Tony Maneotis and Chris Nichols are current board members fighting to keep their seats. The only outside contester is Bruce Trimberg.

Candidates will be selected by majority vote. The person who gets the least amount of votes will not make it onto the board.

The May 6 election will go from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and take place at the Craig Fire Department. For more information, call Ashley Ellis, designated election official, at 970-824-5914.

Colorado farmers can grow industrial hemp

The Colorado Department of Agriculture has adopted the first industrial hemp rules in state history. The rules became effective Dec. 30, according to a release. Producer registration with CDA's industrial hemp program opened March 1.

"These rules are the first step to allow Colorado producers to legally grow industrial hemp," Colorado Deputy Commissioner of Agriculture Ron Carleton said.

Producers must register with CDA by May 1 if they would like to grow industrial hemp during the 2014 growing season. The annual registration fee for commercial production of industrial hemp will be $200 plus $1 per acre. The annual registration fee for production of industrial hemp for research and development will be $100 plus $5 per acre. All registrations will be valid for one year from date of issuance.

All registrants are subject to sampling of their industrial hemp crop to verify that the THC concentration does not exceed 0.3 percent on dry weight basis; as many as 33 percent of the registrants will be inspected each year. During the inspection, the registrant or authorized representative must provide the department's inspector with complete and unrestricted access to all industrial hemp plants and seeds whether growing or harvested, all land, buildings and other structures used for the cultivation and storage of industrial hemp, as well as all documents and records pertaining to the registrant's industrial hemp growing business.

The rules were developed in response to the recent passing of Amendment 64 and legislation enacted by the Colorado General Assembly. SB13-241 delegates to the department the responsibility for establishing a registration and inspection program.

"The General Assembly, with SB13-241, has made it clear that cultivation, for either commercial or research and development purposes, is not authorized unless the prospective grower first registers with the department," Carleton said.

The rules and more information about industrial hemp can be found by visiting http://www.colorado.gov/ag/dpi.