Craig briefs: Craig Rotary accepting flag sponsorships | CraigDailyPress.com

Craig briefs: Craig Rotary accepting flag sponsorships

Craig Rotary currently is selling sponsorships for its American flag program. Each contribution sponsors a flag to be placed along Victory Way and Yampa Avenue during patriotic holidays throughout the year. As the flag sponsorship grows, so does the number of flags placed along Victory Way. Sponsorship costs $75 per flag. To sponsor a flag, call Bob Johnson at 970-846-3647 or Randy Morton at 970-620-6663.

Community Easter egg hunt will be April 12

New Creation Church in Craig will hold a community Easter Egg hunt April 12. Registration begins at 10 a.m. and the hunt will start at 11 a.m. A host of activities also will be on hand, including face painting, a bouncy house, petting zoo and photo booth. Toddlers through fifth-graders must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. More than 10,000 eggs will be hidden and 16 new bikes will be given away to children. The church is located at 520 Westridge Road. For more information, call Jessica Ashton at 970-826-4759.

New data reveals all of Colorado at high risk

Twelve Colorado counties previously considered to be at moderate risk for radon exposure have been upgraded to the high-risk category, according to a press release. The change means all 64 Colorado counties are categorized as Zone 1 for radon, or high-risk by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Counties in Zone 1 have an estimated indoor radon average greater than four picocuries per liter (pCi/L), the action level at which EPA recommends homeowners install mitigation equipment.

The 12 affected counties are: Alamosa, Archuleta, Conejos, Costilla, Eagle, Hinsdale, La Plata, Mineral, Rio Grande, Routt, Saguache and San Juan. Although the designation does not mean that every home in the county will have radon above the action level, state officials strongly encourage all Colorado residents to test their homes for radon and to consider installing mitigation systems if radon levels exceed four pCi/L.

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"We've always known radon was a problem in Colorado," said Chrystine Kelley, manager of the radon program at the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. "But this new data confirms a need for heightened awareness, more testing and a more proactive mindset, such as building new homes with radon-resistant construction from the start."

A colorless, odorless radioactive gas, radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. Radon, which occurs naturally from the decay of uranium in soil, is abundant in Colorado. The only way to know if your household is being exposed to radon is to test. Test kits are inexpensive and the tests are easy to perform. For additional information, visit http://www.coloradoradon.info. 

Guided sage grouse tours to take place in April

Colorado Parks and Wildlife and Conservation Colorado and its partners — Rocky Mountain Wild, The Wilderness Society and Friends of Northwest Colorado — are offering an opportunity to get a look at mating greater sage grouse during guided viewing tours in Northwest Colorado through April 13.

For thousands of years, sage grouse have returned to their traditional breeding grounds to perform a dramatic and complex dance as they compete for mates. Watching male sage grouse spread their spiked tail feathers and pop their large air sacs is a treat for birdwatchers or any wildlife enthusiast.

CPW provides a viewing trailer for the guided tour so that people can sit inside and not disturb the grouse on the lek.

The public is reminded that the locations are remote and primitive. Parents with young children or anyone with special needs are asked to inquire about accommodations by contacting Sasha Nelson at sasha@conservationco.org.

For dates, times, information and to reserve your spot, visit http://www.conservationco.org and click on "Sage Grouse Tours."