Craig briefs: Coffee and a Newspaper to discuss election results | CraigDailyPress.com

Craig briefs: Coffee and a Newspaper to discuss election results

Join Craig Daily Press Publisher Renee Campbell and Managing Editor Noelle Leavitt Riley at 7 a.m. Wednesday at The Memorial Hospital to discuss the 2014 election results.

The Daily Press hosts Coffee and a Newspaper on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call 970-875-1788 or 970-875-1790.

Field dressing class coming to Grand Valley

With the big game hunting seasons upon us, Colorado Parks and Wildlife will offer a free Field Dressing Big Game seminar to show hunters how to care for their harvested animal, from the field to the table, according to a press release.

The class will take place at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the agency's Horsethief Canyon State Wildlife Area near Fruita. Registration is required and is limited to the first 20 that sign up. For more information and to reserve your spot, visit http://www.register-ed.com/events/view/53580 or call 970-255-6100.



Colorado hunting regulations require that all big game animals be prepared for human consumption as soon as possible after being harvested.



New Christmas choir seeks participants

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Craig is looking for participants of all denominations for a new Christmas choir called the Community Christmas Celebration Choir, which is an interfaith group of singers. Rehearsals take place from 5 to 7 p.m. Sundays at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints located at 1295 W. Ninth St. In November, rehearsal times move to 6 to 8 p.m.

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All are welcome to attend. The choir will perform two pieces from Handel's "Messiah" at the concert at 6 p.m. Dec. 14 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Practices run through Dec. 7. For more information, call 323-445-2239.

CPW asks to keep dogs from chasing wildlife

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is issuing a warning to people whose dogs chase wildlife: Keep them under control and away from deer, elk and other wild animals, or face the possibility of steep fines and the loss of a beloved pet.

Dogs that chase wild animals can cause them extreme stress and injuries from bites, wildlife officials said.

By late winter, many big game animals that are susceptible to dog harassment are pregnant females. As they run to escape, deer and elk expend crucial energy that can lead to an increase in the mortality rate of the animals or their unborn calves and fawns.

To report any instance of dogs chasing wildlife, the public can call the local Colorado Parks and Wildlife office or Colorado State Patrol. In Colorado, the fine for knowingly or negligently allowing a dog to harass wildlife is $274, including surcharges.

Driving under effects of marijuana is illegal

As new laws based on Amendment 64 continue to regulate recreational marijuana, the Colorado State Patrol reminds motorists that driving while impaired by marijuana is illegal.

Recent changes, which loosen rules governing the purchase, possession and consumption of marijuana by adults who are 21 and older, do not mitigate the responsibility to drive sober at all times.

All CSP troopers are trained in the detection of impairment from alcohol, drugs and other substances. Also, many troopers have received additional training as certified drug recognition experts. During the course of a traffic contact, any driver suspected of driving while impaired by marijuana may be asked to complete voluntary roadside maneuvers and submit to a chemical test. Refusal of a chemical test results in stricter penalties than compliance.

Troopers actively will seek and arrest impaired drivers. The increased vigilance leading into 2014 underscores the agency's ongoing commitment to combating impaired driving through intelligence-led enforcement strategies across the state.