7 things to know about the Moffat County High School pool | CraigDailyPress.com

7 things to know about the Moffat County High School pool

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about the high school pool

Following are answers to questions the community is asking about the Moffat County High School swimming pool.

• Why was the decision made to close the pool now and not a year from now?

Moffat County School District Superintendent Dave Ulrich: We've known its been in bad shape for 20 years. The closure has been put off each year since 2011 to provide the community with the opportunity to find a solution.

KL&A engineering report from May 2015, presented to the board in June 2015: I recommend that pool be removed and reconstructed to accommodate expansive soils.

The 2016 Colorado Department of Education Building Excellent Schools Today Assessment: (The) system has had major settling problems and has been re-leveled in years past with no positive result. The system is past its useful life cycle and should be budgeted for replacement before further failure can occur.

Ulrich: A pump went out last week … we are chasing a losing battle.

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Assessment by the Colorado Department of Education from 2016 recommending closure of the high school pool.

The pool does not have a separate water meter, so how can the district determine the water loss and that it comes from the pool?

Ulrich: There has not been a separate meter on the pool. However, after the PVC liner was installed in the pool in 1995, maintenance staff noticed that the water fill system was running continually in order to keep the pool filled. At that time, a five-gallon bucket was used under the fill valve, and the time it took to fill the bucket was recorded. The numbers were running around 400 gallons in about 24 hour period. That process was repeated at facilities director Mike Taylor's request, and the estimate is sound. Additionally, the 2015 engineering report confirms the leaking of the pool. A water meter was installed last week, and we should have more information to share later this week. 

 

Photo from the 2015 KL&A Engineering report showing water spilling from the pool towards the rest of the school.

• Where is all that water going? Is it possible that a sinkhole is forming under the school?

Ulrich: I just don't know. I'm not going to speculate if it's possible, but experts have said the foundation of the school is safe. The BEST Assessment looked at the entire school and it was not deemed to be unsafe.

What's next for Northwest Colorado competitive swimmers?

Ulrich: The district is committed to partnering with our other civic partners to find a long-term solution. If a hotel pool wanted to step up and offer the opportunity for our kids to practice, we wouldn't say “no.”

Who makes the decision about pool closure and how?

Ulrich: It will be a piece of the budget process, which is not why this has come up. It came up because I have Mike Taylor and two engineering reports that say close that pool.

It does not require board approval, however, I want to work with the board and make them aware of the budgetary impact. The board could tell the administration to keep it open.

When will the pool be closed?

Ulrich: After normal operating procedures — boys swim team, Special Olympics and until Sea Sharks move their practice to the city pool, by the first of June. I want people to know that this was not a cavalier decision.

Contact Sasha Nelson at 970-875-1794 or snelson@CraigDailyPress.com.