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Hayden community mourns death of high school wrestling coach

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Chad Jones represented Hayden High School when he was a senior by bringing home a state wrestling title, and he influenced his community by passing on his love of sports to a new generation of athletes as a youth football and wrestling coach.

On Tuesday, Jones was remembered by many as a man who seemed to have an impact on the entire town.

“He touched a lot of people’s lives in a very positive way, both young and old,” said Nick Planansky, who worked under Jones as an assistant coach for the Hayden High School wrestling team. “He loved his coaching. He was there night and day for the kids, and anytime anybody needed anything he was there for them.”

The 39-year-old Jones, who took the job as the Tigers head wrestling coach in 2012, died Monday afternoon in his Hayden home.

The news passed through the small West Routt County community Tuesday, leaving many local residents saddened by the news.

“I don’t think there is person who is not affected by this,” said Ashley McMurray, a friend and town council member. “His goal in life was to make kids smile, and he would do anything to do that — it made him happy.”

Jones graduated from Hayden High School in 1997 and won a state wrestling title in the 171-pound class that same year. Shortly after high school, he started coaching youth wrestling and peewee football.

“He was into peewee football and wrestling since just a few years after high school,” said former Hayden wrestling coach and athletic director Ty Zabel. “Chad was all about the kids, always. He would help them out if they were having trouble with their school work, and he always had their back.”

Jones also loved getting outdoors, normally with a fishing rod, whenever possible. He also loved being part of the Hayden community.

“Chad was my godfather. He was there when I was born in the hospital with my dad, and him and my dad smoked cigars celebrating after I was born,” said Christian Carson, who was coached by Jones throughout his wrestling career. “I grew up with Chad. We would go fishing together, we would do everything … He wasn’t just my coach, he was a family member.”

Carson said Jones was there for him in 2017 when he blew out his hamstring during his final high school football season and then struggled to get back into shape for wrestling.

“Chad was always there in your ear whether he was talking to you or yelling from across wrestling floor,” Carson said. “He told us that we were winners no matter what the scoreboard says and no matter what anyone says as long as you know in your heart that you gave 110 percent."

With Jones' support, Carson worked hard his senior season, and by the time the state championships rolled around, he was not only back in shape but found himself fighting for a state title.

Of course, Jones was in Carson’s corner as he battled in the 195-pound class at the state finals. Carson lost the match to John Mall's Jason Murphy, 3-2, but Jones was there to put the match into perspective.

“After I lost my finals match my senior year and after I was all done crying, he told me, ‘You know what a dollar and a state title will get you in Denver?’" Carson recalls. “You can buy a cup of coffee.”

On the mat, Soroco wrestling coach Jay Whaley and Jones were opponents, but the two shared a love of wrestling and a love for teaching kids.

“It’s a huge loss and my heart is broke over the whole situation. I knew him as a competitor, I knew him as a coach and I knew him, mostly, as a friend,” Whaley said.

“The one thing I always appreciated about Chad is that he knew it was all about wrestling and the kids,” Whaley said. “We supported each other when we had home dual meets. We went to each other’s home tournaments, and we knew in order for wrestling to survive in Routt County we needed to support each other.”

Whaley said he had talked to Jones a few weeks ago about the upcoming season.

“I feel bad for all those kids in that community,” Whaley said. “I feel bad for the whole wrestling community here. ”

Jones' father Mike and younger brother Justin still live in Hayden. His younger sister, who now lives in Colorado Springs, fought through tears Tuesday when asked how she would want community members to remember her brother.

“I would want people to know just how proud he was of his own kids, just how proud of Piperjo and Saben he was, and just — from my own private conversations — how much he looked up to my dad,” Davis said. “I would want them to know just how proud he was of all the kids that he coached and how proud he was to be a part of the community in Hayden.”

To reach John F. Russell, call 970-871-4209, email jrussell@SteamboatPilot.com or follow him on Twitter @Framp1966.

Bulldog Sports — Week of Sept. 19, 2018

Wednesday

5:15 p.m. Craig Parks and Recreation Doak Walker third- and fourth-grade tackle football at Woodbury Sports Complex, 250 Mack Lane

Thursday

None

Friday

1 p.m. Moffat County High School and Craig Middle School cross country at Shana Ward Memorial Invitational in Saratoga, Wyoming

3 p.m. Colorado Northwestern Community College men’s soccer at College of Southern Nevada in Henderson, Nevada

Saturday

9 a.m. Craig Middle School volleyball vs. Rifle and Soroco at Rifle

9 a.m. Craig Middle School football at Rifle

11 a.m. Moffat County High School boys soccer vs. Grand Valley High School in Parachute

Noon Moffat County High School C-Team volleyball vs. Gunnison at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

1 p.m. Moffat County High School junior varsity volleyball vs. Gunnison at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

1 p.m. Moffat County High School varsity football vs. Pagosa Springs at Olathe High School

1 p.m. Colorado Northwestern Community College men’s soccer at College of Southern Nevada in Henderson, Nevada

2 p.m. Moffat County High School varsity volleyball vs. Gunnison at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

5 p.m. Moffat County High School wrestling prime rib dinner at Center of Craig, 601 Yampa Ave.

5:30 p.m. Humane Society of Moffat County bowling fundraiser at Thunder Rolls Bowling Center, 900 Industrial Ave.

Sunday

None

Monday

4:30 p.m. Moffat County High School junior varsity football vs. Meeker at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

7 p.m. Moffat County High School Homecoming Powder Puff Football at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

Tuesday

4 p.m. Moffat County High School boys soccer vs. Aspen at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

4:15 p.m. Craig Middle School football vs. Saratoga, Wyoming at CMS, 915 Yampa Ave.

4:30 p.m. Craig Middle School cross country at Soroco Invitational in Oak Creek

5:15 p.m. Craig Parks and Recreation Doak Walker fifth- and sixth-grade tackle football at Woodbury Sports Complex, 250 Mack Lane

Horses not displaced by fire, closures remain as containment tightens on Boone Draw fire

CRAIG — Access to public lands affected by fire may reopen soon, officials indicated in a news release Monday, Sept. 17.

Fire activity on Boone Draw Fire has greatly diminished through the past several days. Fire crews have made significant progress, achieving approximately 80-percent containment Monday, though hot, dry weather is expected to continue throughout the week.

While the fire is holding at 8,683 acres, only 202 acres are within the Sand Wash Basin Wild Horse Herd Management Area.

The Sand Wash herd appears not to have been significantly displaced by the fire. Firefighters have observed horses enter the burned area, drink from springs, and exit toward Sevenmile Ridge. The fire burned some fences around the HMA, and temporary fencing has been erected in affected areas.

Along with containment, crews are focused on mopping up and repairing fire suppression impacts. Fire officials are beginning to release fire crews, as fire activity declines and work nears completion. Several engines were released Monday, with more crews expected to be released Tuesday and Wednesday.

County Roads and BLM lands around the fire remain closed to public entry for firefighter and public safety. BLM and Moffat County officials continue to assess the closure, with a goal of reopening the area as quickly as possible. Visitors looking for horse viewing opportunities can access the HMA by way of Moffat County Road 75, along with the Sevenmile Ridge area north of the fire.

The Craig Interagency Dispatch Center reported engaging on 200 wildfires, five false alarms, and 92 smoke checks as of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18.

On Sunday, the smaller Three Wash fire was reported contained to 369 acres.

Three other large fires — Cabin Lake, Silver Creek, and Ryan fires — are also burning in the region.

Cabin Lake fire

The emergency area closure has been lifted for forest and BLM lands near the Cabin Lake fire.

Much of the burned area has cooled, but there is still active fire in the Sterry Lake area. The Sterry Lake Trail Number 2240 and Forest Service Road 240 will remain closed until fire activity there ceases.

A map of the Cabin Lake fire as of Sept. 2.

The Cabin Lake Fire is 98-percent contained, though it continues to burn in interior fuels.

"We are still seeing smoke from the fire as the interior continues to burn," said Incident Commander Rita Clipperton. "We will continue to have firefighters monitoring it daily and responding if any containment lines are threatened."

Hunters and others entering recently burned areas should exercise caution and understand that fire can create forest hazards. Fire-weakened trees may fall, and roots of trees can burn underground, creating ash pits that may not be readily visible. Burned forests are especially hazardous in windy conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Silver Creek fire

A map of the Silver Lake Fire as of Tuesday, Sept. 18.

The Silver Creek fire is now at 12,214 acres, with 35 percent containment. On Monday, evacuated residents of Gore Lakes and Old Park were allowed by the Grand County Sheriff's Office to return to their homes. Firefighters are working to limit the fire's impact on local communities.

Personnel are actively engaging the fire where it is safe to do so and implementing a full suppression strategy. Crews are working the southeastern edge of the Sarvis Creek Wilderness in the Silver Creek drainage west of Colorado Highway 100. More than 420 firefighters are now working the fire.

Resources are limited in the area with the new Ryan Fire near Walden. Currently, the Silver Creek Fire takes priority for air support.

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The Ryan Fire

On Monday, a combination of increased cloud cover and lighter winds helped minimize growth of the Ryan Fire. Scattered showers fell on portions of the fire Monday afternoon.

Map of the Ryan Fire as of Monday, Sept. 17.

The fire, located 27 miles northwest of Walden, is burning in the Routt National Forest within Jackson County, and the Medicine Bow National Forest within Carbon County, Wyoming. The Ryan Fire is currently at 2,470 acres with no containment. The cause remains under investigation.

An area closure is in place for National Forest System lands surrounding the Ryan Fire to ensure the protection of the public and fire personnel and will remain in effect until rescinded. This closure is on portions of both the Routt and Medicine Bow National Forests.

The Ryan Fire area closure will primarily affect hunters with licenses in Game Management Unit 161, as well as Elk Area 13 and Deer Area 81 in Wyoming. Hunters are encouraged to obtain a copy of the area closure map before heading into the field.

The complete closure order and map are available at inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6210/.

Contact Jim Patterson at 970-875-1790 or jpatterson@CraigDailyPress.com or Sasha Nelson at 970-875-1794 or snelson@CraigDailyPress.com.

Toy car strikes real car: On the Record — Monday, Sept. 17

Craig Police Department

Monday, Sept. 17

2:50 a.m. On the 300 block of Colorado Highway 13, officers with the Craig Police Department saw an open toolbox in the back of a pick-up truck and contacted the owner. The owner didn't notice any tools missing.

5:06 a.m. On the 1100 block of Sixth Street, officers found a woman sleeping in a car. They asked the woman to move on.

7:54 a.m. On the 1100 block of Crest Drive, a caller reported a hunting bow was stolen from her car. Officers took a report.

9:39 a.m. On U.S. Highway 40, a caller reported seeing a car cross the yellow line and tailgate other vehicles. Officers were not able to locate the car.

10:31 a.m. On the 4200 block of U.S. 40, a caller reported his maroon Jeep had been stolen. Officers are investigating.

3:45 p.m. On the 2400 block of Victory Way, officers responded to a vehicle crash in which a truck towing a trailer hit a car. There were no injuries, but both vehicles sustained minor damage.

5:40 p.m. On the 500 block of First Avenue, a caller reported seeing two men sitting in front of a grill for more than an hour. Officers determined there was no crime.

7:30 p.m. On the 3800 Exmoor Circle, a caller reported a boy in a toy car had run into their parked car. Officers warned the boy and his father.

10:25 p.m. On the 2300 block of Victory Way, a caller reported seeing a car driving around the block slowly for about an hour. When officers arrived to speak to the driver, they learned she had a trespassing warning and wanted to park in a location that didn't violate the warning. Officers determined there was no crime.

Craig firefighters raise more than $8K during Fill the Boot campaign

CRAIG — Firefighter boots filled with spare change overflowed as the community helped to raise $8,420.11 in support of the Muscular Dystrophy Association. 

The effort “raised the highest amount to date,” said Krystal Price, whose son, JP Price, has Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

With the help of more than 100,000 firefighters across the county, in a tradition that began in 1954, MDA is “Giving Muscular Dystrophy the Boot.” The organization uses funds for research, care centers, to send kids with muscular dystrophy to summer camp, and to support local families facing the disease.

“For more than 60 years, Fill the Boot has been a strong firefighter tradition, giving families with muscular dystrophy in hometowns across America hope for the future and support for today,” according to firefighters.mda.org website.

Muscular dystrophy is a group of genetic diseases that cause progressive weakness and loss of muscle mass.

About one-third of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy — the most common form — don’t have a family history of the disease, possibly because the gene involved may be subject to sudden abnormal change — spontaneous mutation, according to the Mayo Clinic.

There’s no cure for muscular dystrophy, but medications and therapy can help manage symptoms and slow the progress of the disease.

“Firefighters have played a major role in funding research for muscular dystrophy and in the last year, three promising new drugs received FDA approval,” states firefighters.mda.org.

Contact Sasha Nelson at 970-875-1794 or snelson@CraigDailyPress.com.

Horses not displaced by fire, closures remain as containment tightens on Boone Draw fire

CRAIG — Access to public lands affected by fire may reopen soon, officials indicated in a press release Monday, Sept. 17.

Fire activity on Boone Draw Fire has greatly reduced the past several days. Fire crews have made significant progress, achieving approximately 80 percent containment Monday as hot, dry weather is expected to continue throughout the week.

While the fire is holding at 8, 683 acres, only 202 acres are actually within the Sand Wash Basin Wild Horse Herd Management Area.

The Sand Wash herd appears not to have been significantly displaced by the fire. Firefighters have observed horses enter the burned area, drink from springs, and exit toward Sevenmile Ridge. The fire burned some fences around the HMA, and temporary fencing has been put in place in affected areas.

Along with containment, crews are focused on mopping up and repairing fire suppression impacts. Fire officials are beginning to release fire crews, as fire activity has declined, and work nears completion. Several engines were released Monday, with more crews expected to be released Tuesday and Wednesday.

County Roads and BLM lands around the fire remain closed to public entry for firefighter and public safety. BLM and Moffat County officials continue to assess the closure, with a goal of reopening access to the area as soon as possible. Visitors looking for horse viewing opportunities can access the HMA by way of Moffat County Road 75, along with the Sevenmile Ridge area north of the fire.

Visit inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6207/ for more information on the area closure.

Boone Draw Fire ignited on BLM land Thursday, Sept. 13; the cause is under investigation. No structures or other infrastructure are threatened, and the fire is burning pinyon-juniper, grass, and sage on Bureau of Land Management and private land, approximately 50 miles west of Craig.

Moffat County and BLM-administered lands within the Little Snake Field Office are under Stage 1 fire restrictions. For information visit moffatcountysheriff.com/pdf/Fire%20Restictions%20Press%20release%202018-2_Stage%201.pdf.

 

Country music star Michael Martin Murphey donates maps to museum, plans return for second benefit concert

CRAIG — Most who would recognize the name Michael Martin Murphey know the man for his music.

A multiple Grammy nominee with six gold albums to his name, Murphey — during his more than 50-year career in the industry — has definitely made his mark on the world of Western and country music.

But even the most die-hard fans of Murphey's music might not know he is also a history buff, and he's taken a keen personal interest in Craig's own Museum of Northwest Colorado.

"I've been interested in history since I was a boy," he said. "I started collecting Indian stuff during a vacation to the Grand Canyon, and that interest grew during my years in the Boy Scouts."

Since then, Murphey has even started a nonprofit — the Murphey Western Institute — established "for the education, preservation, and perpetuation of the arts, culture, history, and legacy of the American West," according to the website.

Murphey's interest in Western history was on prominent display Monday, Sept. 17, when he stopped by the museum to donate a set of historic maps created in the 1960s by Los Alamos physicist Perry Van Arsdale and depicting the historic pioneer and Indian trails of the lower 48 states.

Characterizing Van Arsdale as "a Western history buff," Murphey described the research behind the creation of the maps as "astounding."

"His (Van Arsdale's) whole mission was just to tie together all the Indian trails, pioneer trails, and trails that knit this country together in a very sophisticated way, long before we thought the populace knew anything about that," Murphey said, adding that he thought museum Director Dan Davidson and Assistant Director Paul Knowles would be interested because "these guys who run this place are trail fanatics."

He said the trails depicted on the maps graphically show much of the impetus behind the United States' Western expansion.

"It really brings out the fact that they thought there was a lot better chance for Western expansion because of these trails that the Indians had done," he said.

During Monday's visit, Murphey also reiterated his support for the museum, saying he is trying to organize his schedule so as to perform a second benefit concert for the museum. Murphey sold out two benefit shows for the museum in April 2017, and said he would welcome the opportunity to play another, given he can work it into his schedule.

"I am a Western history buff," Murphey said. "I've been all over the country, and I've seen just about every Western museum. (The Museum of Northwest Colorado) is a real gem, and it really deserves saving."

Murphey said he first learned of the museum through a promoter in Grand Junction, who told Murphey he should visit. Murphey took that suggestion, and the rest is history.

There is no definite word on when Murphey might return for another show, but he said he wants to organize the event before the Nov. 6 General Election, when Moffat County voters will decide on whether to approve a dedicated mill levy to benefit the museum and the Moffat County Libraries system.

"I just have to work it into my schedule somewhere," Murphey said, "but regardless of that, the museum could use a lot more private support. They have lots of exhibits here, and curating is expensive."

Contact Jim Patterson at 970-875-1790 or jpatterson@CraigDailyPress.com.

Reconstructed Swinging Bridge at Browns Park dedicated

BROWNS PARK — Following 10 weeks of construction, the historic Swinging Bridge at Browns Park was officially rededicated Tuesday, Sept. 18, during a ceremony held at the renovated structure.

But the short construction time belies the true scope of the challenge.

Tuesday's dedication brought to a close a more-than four year quest to restore the historic bridge, an effort that began in June 2014, when a tractor, owned by rancher and former Moffat County Commissioner T. Wright Dickinson, partially broke through the bridge's decking as its driver was attempting to cross.

The tractor's operator was uninjured, and Dickinson, with assistance from the Moffat County Road and Bridge Department, was able to remove the tractor about a week later. But the damage left the bridge — which is located about a mile east of the Colorado-Utah border and is the only permanent crossing of the Green River in the area — impassable, effectively adding 30 miles and nearly an hour's driving time to the trip between Colorado and Utah and vice-versa.

It also — and for several reasons — left the county in a quandary.

First, the engineering inspection of the bridge — which is required following such an accident — uncovered a number of problems unrelated to the tractor incident, drawing into question how much of the needed work could be attributed to the accident and how much was the result of unrelated maintenance issues. This also injected uncertainty into how much repairing the bridge would cost.

Second, when Moffat County Director of Development Services Roy Tipton began researching potential grant funding to help repair and refurbish the bridge, he made a troubling discovery: The structure did not belong to Moffat County; rather, it belonged to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, meaning the county was ineligible for many of the grant opportunities which would have been afforded by ownership.

In the end — and through a lot of effort — these obstacles were transformed into opportunities, and thanks to an unprecedented level of cooperation between 14 federal and state agencies, the final solution resulted in an almost entirely new bridge that essentially cost Moffat County nothing.

"None of this could happen without a lot of help from all these various agencies — and their money, of course," Tipton said.

Bigger problems

"When they did all that inspection work, there were some items there besides the damage from the tractor that made repairs difficult," Tipton said. Specifically, the inspection revealed rust issues with some of the bridge's main beams, a situation what would have to be addressed.

"In order to fix that, you have to take the whole thing apart," he said. "So, at that point, it doesn't make any sense to put it back together like it was."

Given that a complete disassembly would be necessary, the county began discussing ways to improve the bridge during the repair process, and among these was the opportunity to increase the weight limit.

"One thing … (we thought) would be beneficial up there is to be able to get a wildland fire truck across that bridge," Tipton said. "So, we started to figure out what kind of design do we need in order to accommodate a fire truck, and that's how this design grew to being what it is now."

As a result, the reconstructed bridge boasts a weight limit of 20 tons, as compared to the 3-ton weight limit for the old bridge.

Funding

Once the inspection had been completed, it was estimated repairing the bridge would cost about $1.9 million. Due to the fact that the structure belonged to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, rather than Moffat County, the prospect of raising this sum was problematic, and a big part of the eventual funding mechanism that repaired of the bridge originated in an unlikely spot: Utah.

Tipton said Utah's Seven County Infrastructure Coalition — comprised of Carbon, Daggett, Duchesne, Emery, San Juan, Sevier, and Uintah counties in Utah — decided to step forward and help with the funding due to the importance of the bridge to commerce in eastern Utah.

“This bridge is important to Daggett County,” Tipton said. " So, they put up $100,000, and that's signficant, because it's coming from Utah.

"It seemed odd … but it is the shortcut to Vernal. You go up through Crous Canyon and down, and it's about an hour faster than going back to Maybell and around."

This makes the bridge vitally important to Utah commerce.

"Dominion Energy operates Clay Basin in Utah, and their guys use that to get to Vernal," Tipton said. "That's why they put some money into it."

And, though $100,000 was only a small part of the needed funding, Tipton said that, once Utah stepped forward with an offer of funding, agencies in Colorado — as well as federal agencies — decided they should also contribute.

All this represented a previously unheard of level of cooperation.

"It's not just the fact that all these people kicked in this money," Museum of Northwest Colorado Assistant Director Paul Knowles said, "it's the fact that this bridge was seen as important enough that all these govenrment agencies that usually don't work together came together. … Everybody came together saying this is a crucial bridge."

The ultimate funding arrangement included an agreement with Fish & Wildlife for Moffat County to retain right-of-way over the bridge for 50 years or "as long as the Swinging Bridge is used as a bridge, so, virtually forever," Tipton said.

The county also established a maintenance agreement with Fish & Wildlife which states the county will be responsible for routine maintenance up to $15,000 per year, but any single repair item that comes up in excess of $5,000, Fish & Wildlife will pay for.

As for the repair costs, Moffat County contributed $100,000 — money that had already been earmarked to replace the decking on the bridge prior to the tractor incident — and $68,000 from Dickinson's insurance settlement.

The remainder of the funds came from other Colorado and Utah agencies, as well as a $500,000 grant from the federal government.

"It's really brought all these agencies together to cooperate and make it work, which is kind of nice," Tipton said.

Engineering and design for the project were completed by SGM, and Mueller Construction Services, Inc. was the general contractor.

Officers respond to numerous reports of domestic violence: On the Record — Sept. 14 through 16

Craig Police Department

Friday, Sept. 14

12:32 a.m. In Craig, officers from the Craig Police Department investigated a possible domestic violence case.

3:21 a.m. Near The Memorial Hospital, officers responded to reports of a disturbance,

3:29 a.m. On the 900 block of Sloan Circle, officers investigated reports of a suspicious person.

10:39 a.m. At the Public Safety Center, officers took a report of suspected domestic violence.

10:49 a.m. In Craig, officers responded to a Safe2Tell notification.

12:37 p.m. On the 800 block of East Seventh Street, officers responded to reports of a suspicious person, article, or vehicle.

3:29 p.m. In Craig, officers continued investigating reports of a person who was missing or had run away.

4:37 p.m. On the 800 block of West First Street, officers took a report of a theft.

6:35 p.m. In Craig, officers investigated a report of possible verbal domestic violence.

6:43 p.m. In Craig, officers investigated a report of possible domestic violence.    

8:25 p.m. On Ledford Street, officers responded to a crash resulting in injury.

Saturday, Sept. 15

5:13 a.m. Near Cramer Flooring, officers made contact with a pedestrian.  

7:12 a.m. In Craig, officers investigated a report of possible domestic violence.

9:58 a.m. On the 600 block of Westridge Road, officers investigated a report of a suspicious person, vehicle, or article.

12:34 p.m. On the 3800 block of West Sixth Street, officers investigated a report of a threat.

12:53 p.m. At Northwest Pawnshop, officers investigated a possible weapons violation.

12:54 p.m. On the 600 block of Wickes Avenue, officers responded to reports of a disturbance.

2:15 p.m. On the 900 block of West First Street, officers investigated a possible assault.

4:07 p.m. On the 1600 block of Yampa Avenue, officers responded to reports of a disturbance.

7:05 p.m. On the 300 block of Cedar Court, officers investigated an incident involving wildlife.

7:13 p.m. On the 700 block of Rose Street, officers investigated reports of a threat.

8:15 p.m. On the 1000 block of East Seventh Street, officers responded to a report of a disturbance.

8:53 p.m. In Craig, officers investigated a report of possible child abuse or neglect.

11:22 p.m. In Craig, officers investigated a report of possible domestic violence.  

Sunday, Sept. 16

12:05 a.m. In Craig, officers investigated a report of possible domestic violence.

6:17 a.m. At Frontier Apartments, officers responded to reports of harassment.  

12:07 p.m. At OP Bar and Grill, officers investigated an alleged theft.

1:27 p.m. In Craig, officers responded to a Safe2Tell notification.

2:34 p.m. At the Popular Bar, officers responded to a report of lost property.

7:57 p.m. On First Street, officers investigated an incident involving wildlife.

8:50 p.m. Near the intersection of Victory Way and Ranney Street, officers responded to reports of roadkill.

11:35 p.m. At East Kum & Go, officers investigated a suspicious vehicle.

Moffat County golfer Torin Reed swings his way to state

With a trip to the regional golf tournament each year of his time as a Bulldog, Moffat County High School’s Torin Reed was more motivated than ever to get to the next level of the sport for his senior year. And, even a lengthy road trip didn’t slow him down.

Reed qualified for the 3A State Championships Monday with a successful round at the Region 4 Tournament at Gunnison’s Dos Rios Golf Club. Carding an 82 for the day, he placed 12th overall, fifth when excluding the top two teams — Aspen and Basalt — which each qualified as a group for state.

Though his score was several strokes over his best, starting with a couple frustrating bogies, Reed experienced a good run through Dos Rios’ front nine, shooting par on seven straight holes, part of 10 total in which he broke even on the par 71 course.

“I was just trying to keep the ball in play, hit the fairways and hit the greens in regulation to make it easy,” he said.

He noted two Par 5 holes that each had ponds tricky to clear, though possible water hazard penalties was a risk that led to reward.

“I just went for it on those, and it really paid off,” he said.

Reed has competed at the regional round all four years at MCHS and notched the lowest scores for the Bulldogs at regionals the past two years. He was only one stroke from alternate status for state in 2017.

Altogether, Moffat County golf placed eighth among 14 full teams. Connor Etzler and Dave Andujo each shot a 95 for the day to tie at 32nd, with Tyler Burkett taking 104 to rank 44th.

Despite a birdie on Dos Rios’ third hole, Andujo was held back by an 8 and a 9 on two Par 4’s, while Etzler shot several 8’s and Burkett a pair of 9’s to add to the struggle on the Gunnison course.

“There’s just so many places to get in trouble there,” MCHS coach Rod Compton. “There’s a lot of lateral hazards, a lot of out-of-bounds stuff, almost every hole is a dog-leg. There’s a lot of trees, a lot of creeks and water. Just a difficult course.”

The 3A state tournament is a two-day event, taking place Oct. 1 and 2 at Boulder Country Club.

“I’ve only looked at that place once online, so I haven’t had much of a chance to study it, don’t know much about it,” Compton said. “For sure, we’ll work on some fine-tuning.”

Reed said he will spend as much time as possible through the end of the month preparing for the tourney, the first time Moffat County has been to the finals since Mike Bingham in 2015.

“I’ll be trying to be more consistent on my irons. Today they were kind of slicing sometimes,” Reed said.

Reed has broken 80 in multiple tournaments this season, and though he’ll be seeing competitors who regularly shoot in the 60s, he’s striving to get as far up the leaderboard as he can.

“I definitely want to place in the top 30,” he said.

State tournament coverage will be available through a new mobile golf application available though Colorado High School Activities Association and Iwanamaker, which can be downloaded at Google Play and Apple’s App Store. Parents and other community members are encouraged to download the app, with 80 percent of the registration cost going toward the CHSAA golf team of their choice.