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Hayden community mourns death of high school wrestling coach

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Chad Jones represented Hayden High School when he was a senior by bringing home a state wrestling title, and he influenced his community by passing on his love of sports to a new generation of athletes as a youth football and wrestling coach.

On Tuesday, Jones was remembered by many as a man who seemed to have an impact on the entire town.

“He touched a lot of people’s lives in a very positive way, both young and old,” said Nick Planansky, who worked under Jones as an assistant coach for the Hayden High School wrestling team. “He loved his coaching. He was there night and day for the kids, and anytime anybody needed anything he was there for them.”

The 39-year-old Jones, who took the job as the Tigers head wrestling coach in 2012, died Monday afternoon in his Hayden home.

The news passed through the small West Routt County community Tuesday, leaving many local residents saddened by the news.

“I don’t think there is person who is not affected by this,” said Ashley McMurray, a friend and town council member. “His goal in life was to make kids smile, and he would do anything to do that — it made him happy.”

Jones graduated from Hayden High School in 1997 and won a state wrestling title in the 171-pound class that same year. Shortly after high school, he started coaching youth wrestling and peewee football.

“He was into peewee football and wrestling since just a few years after high school,” said former Hayden wrestling coach and athletic director Ty Zabel. “Chad was all about the kids, always. He would help them out if they were having trouble with their school work, and he always had their back.”

Jones also loved getting outdoors, normally with a fishing rod, whenever possible. He also loved being part of the Hayden community.

“Chad was my godfather. He was there when I was born in the hospital with my dad, and him and my dad smoked cigars celebrating after I was born,” said Christian Carson, who was coached by Jones throughout his wrestling career. “I grew up with Chad. We would go fishing together, we would do everything … He wasn’t just my coach, he was a family member.”

Carson said Jones was there for him in 2017 when he blew out his hamstring during his final high school football season and then struggled to get back into shape for wrestling.

“Chad was always there in your ear whether he was talking to you or yelling from across wrestling floor,” Carson said. “He told us that we were winners no matter what the scoreboard says and no matter what anyone says as long as you know in your heart that you gave 110 percent."

With Jones' support, Carson worked hard his senior season, and by the time the state championships rolled around, he was not only back in shape but found himself fighting for a state title.

Of course, Jones was in Carson’s corner as he battled in the 195-pound class at the state finals. Carson lost the match to John Mall's Jason Murphy, 3-2, but Jones was there to put the match into perspective.

“After I lost my finals match my senior year and after I was all done crying, he told me, ‘You know what a dollar and a state title will get you in Denver?’" Carson recalls. “You can buy a cup of coffee.”

On the mat, Soroco wrestling coach Jay Whaley and Jones were opponents, but the two shared a love of wrestling and a love for teaching kids.

“It’s a huge loss and my heart is broke over the whole situation. I knew him as a competitor, I knew him as a coach and I knew him, mostly, as a friend,” Whaley said.

“The one thing I always appreciated about Chad is that he knew it was all about wrestling and the kids,” Whaley said. “We supported each other when we had home dual meets. We went to each other’s home tournaments, and we knew in order for wrestling to survive in Routt County we needed to support each other.”

Whaley said he had talked to Jones a few weeks ago about the upcoming season.

“I feel bad for all those kids in that community,” Whaley said. “I feel bad for the whole wrestling community here. ”

Jones' father Mike and younger brother Justin still live in Hayden. His younger sister, who now lives in Colorado Springs, fought through tears Tuesday when asked how she would want community members to remember her brother.

“I would want people to know just how proud he was of his own kids, just how proud of Piperjo and Saben he was, and just — from my own private conversations — how much he looked up to my dad,” Davis said. “I would want them to know just how proud he was of all the kids that he coached and how proud he was to be a part of the community in Hayden.”

To reach John F. Russell, call 970-871-4209, email jrussell@SteamboatPilot.com or follow him on Twitter @Framp1966.

Bulldog Sports — Week of Sept. 19, 2018

Wednesday

5:15 p.m. Craig Parks and Recreation Doak Walker third- and fourth-grade tackle football at Woodbury Sports Complex, 250 Mack Lane

Thursday

None

Friday

1 p.m. Moffat County High School and Craig Middle School cross country at Shana Ward Memorial Invitational in Saratoga, Wyoming

3 p.m. Colorado Northwestern Community College men’s soccer at College of Southern Nevada in Henderson, Nevada

Saturday

9 a.m. Craig Middle School volleyball vs. Rifle and Soroco at Rifle

9 a.m. Craig Middle School football at Rifle

11 a.m. Moffat County High School boys soccer vs. Grand Valley High School in Parachute

Noon Moffat County High School C-Team volleyball vs. Gunnison at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

1 p.m. Moffat County High School junior varsity volleyball vs. Gunnison at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

1 p.m. Moffat County High School varsity football vs. Pagosa Springs at Olathe High School

1 p.m. Colorado Northwestern Community College men’s soccer at College of Southern Nevada in Henderson, Nevada

2 p.m. Moffat County High School varsity volleyball vs. Gunnison at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

5 p.m. Moffat County High School wrestling prime rib dinner at Center of Craig, 601 Yampa Ave.

5:30 p.m. Humane Society of Moffat County bowling fundraiser at Thunder Rolls Bowling Center, 900 Industrial Ave.

Sunday

None

Monday

4:30 p.m. Moffat County High School junior varsity football vs. Meeker at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

7 p.m. Moffat County High School Homecoming Powder Puff Football at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

Tuesday

4 p.m. Moffat County High School boys soccer vs. Aspen at MCHS, 900 Finley Lane

4:15 p.m. Craig Middle School football vs. Saratoga, Wyoming at CMS, 915 Yampa Ave.

4:30 p.m. Craig Middle School cross country at Soroco Invitational in Oak Creek

5:15 p.m. Craig Parks and Recreation Doak Walker fifth- and sixth-grade tackle football at Woodbury Sports Complex, 250 Mack Lane

Horses not displaced by fire, closures remain as containment tightens on Boone Draw fire

CRAIG — Access to public lands affected by fire may reopen soon, officials indicated in a news release Monday, Sept. 17.

Fire activity on Boone Draw Fire has greatly diminished through the past several days. Fire crews have made significant progress, achieving approximately 80-percent containment Monday, though hot, dry weather is expected to continue throughout the week.

While the fire is holding at 8,683 acres, only 202 acres are within the Sand Wash Basin Wild Horse Herd Management Area.

The Sand Wash herd appears not to have been significantly displaced by the fire. Firefighters have observed horses enter the burned area, drink from springs, and exit toward Sevenmile Ridge. The fire burned some fences around the HMA, and temporary fencing has been erected in affected areas.

Along with containment, crews are focused on mopping up and repairing fire suppression impacts. Fire officials are beginning to release fire crews, as fire activity declines and work nears completion. Several engines were released Monday, with more crews expected to be released Tuesday and Wednesday.

County Roads and BLM lands around the fire remain closed to public entry for firefighter and public safety. BLM and Moffat County officials continue to assess the closure, with a goal of reopening the area as quickly as possible. Visitors looking for horse viewing opportunities can access the HMA by way of Moffat County Road 75, along with the Sevenmile Ridge area north of the fire.

The Craig Interagency Dispatch Center reported engaging on 200 wildfires, five false alarms, and 92 smoke checks as of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18.

On Sunday, the smaller Three Wash fire was reported contained to 369 acres.

Three other large fires — Cabin Lake, Silver Creek, and Ryan fires — are also burning in the region.

Cabin Lake fire

The emergency area closure has been lifted for forest and BLM lands near the Cabin Lake fire.

Much of the burned area has cooled, but there is still active fire in the Sterry Lake area. The Sterry Lake Trail Number 2240 and Forest Service Road 240 will remain closed until fire activity there ceases.

A map of the Cabin Lake fire as of Sept. 2.

The Cabin Lake Fire is 98-percent contained, though it continues to burn in interior fuels.

"We are still seeing smoke from the fire as the interior continues to burn," said Incident Commander Rita Clipperton. "We will continue to have firefighters monitoring it daily and responding if any containment lines are threatened."

Hunters and others entering recently burned areas should exercise caution and understand that fire can create forest hazards. Fire-weakened trees may fall, and roots of trees can burn underground, creating ash pits that may not be readily visible. Burned forests are especially hazardous in windy conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Silver Creek fire

A map of the Silver Lake Fire as of Tuesday, Sept. 18.

The Silver Creek fire is now at 12,214 acres, with 35 percent containment. On Monday, evacuated residents of Gore Lakes and Old Park were allowed by the Grand County Sheriff's Office to return to their homes. Firefighters are working to limit the fire's impact on local communities.

Personnel are actively engaging the fire where it is safe to do so and implementing a full suppression strategy. Crews are working the southeastern edge of the Sarvis Creek Wilderness in the Silver Creek drainage west of Colorado Highway 100. More than 420 firefighters are now working the fire.

Resources are limited in the area with the new Ryan Fire near Walden. Currently, the Silver Creek Fire takes priority for air support.

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The Ryan Fire

On Monday, a combination of increased cloud cover and lighter winds helped minimize growth of the Ryan Fire. Scattered showers fell on portions of the fire Monday afternoon.

Map of the Ryan Fire as of Monday, Sept. 17.

The fire, located 27 miles northwest of Walden, is burning in the Routt National Forest within Jackson County, and the Medicine Bow National Forest within Carbon County, Wyoming. The Ryan Fire is currently at 2,470 acres with no containment. The cause remains under investigation.

An area closure is in place for National Forest System lands surrounding the Ryan Fire to ensure the protection of the public and fire personnel and will remain in effect until rescinded. This closure is on portions of both the Routt and Medicine Bow National Forests.

The Ryan Fire area closure will primarily affect hunters with licenses in Game Management Unit 161, as well as Elk Area 13 and Deer Area 81 in Wyoming. Hunters are encouraged to obtain a copy of the area closure map before heading into the field.

The complete closure order and map are available at inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6210/.

Contact Jim Patterson at 970-875-1790 or jpatterson@CraigDailyPress.com or Sasha Nelson at 970-875-1794 or snelson@CraigDailyPress.com.

Toy car strikes real car: On the Record — Monday, Sept. 17

Craig Police Department

Monday, Sept. 17

2:50 a.m. On the 300 block of Colorado Highway 13, officers with the Craig Police Department saw an open toolbox in the back of a pick-up truck and contacted the owner. The owner didn't notice any tools missing.

5:06 a.m. On the 1100 block of Sixth Street, officers found a woman sleeping in a car. They asked the woman to move on.

7:54 a.m. On the 1100 block of Crest Drive, a caller reported a hunting bow was stolen from her car. Officers took a report.

9:39 a.m. On U.S. Highway 40, a caller reported seeing a car cross the yellow line and tailgate other vehicles. Officers were not able to locate the car.

10:31 a.m. On the 4200 block of U.S. 40, a caller reported his maroon Jeep had been stolen. Officers are investigating.

3:45 p.m. On the 2400 block of Victory Way, officers responded to a vehicle crash in which a truck towing a trailer hit a car. There were no injuries, but both vehicles sustained minor damage.

5:40 p.m. On the 500 block of First Avenue, a caller reported seeing two men sitting in front of a grill for more than an hour. Officers determined there was no crime.

7:30 p.m. On the 3800 Exmoor Circle, a caller reported a boy in a toy car had run into their parked car. Officers warned the boy and his father.

10:25 p.m. On the 2300 block of Victory Way, a caller reported seeing a car driving around the block slowly for about an hour. When officers arrived to speak to the driver, they learned she had a trespassing warning and wanted to park in a location that didn't violate the warning. Officers determined there was no crime.

Moffat County commissioners briefed on Amendment 73 by superintendent

CRAIG — Moffat County School District Superintendent Dave Ulrich gave the Moffat County Board of County Commissioners a presentation about Amendment 73 during the body’s regular meeting, held Tuesday, Sept. 18.

Ulrich said Amendment 73, if approved by voters, will help fund Colorado schools by increasing income taxes for C corporations and decreasing property taxes for most business property owners, farmers, and ranchers.

“I want you to have confidence and facts surrounding Amendment 73,” Ulrich said. “Others in the county will look to you as folks who are informed on the issues that will appear on the ballot.”

If approved, Amendment 73 would generate $2.6 million for the Moffat County School District annually, Ulrich said. Some school districts in Colorado are still struggling in the wake of the Great Recession, and though Ulrich acknowledged this year’s district budget has recovered to levels similar to pre-recession years, he added it was a long process that took years.

If the amendment passes, it will increase the school district’s budget by approximately 10 percent, Ulrich said, which would be a “game changer.” He added he plans to continue promoting the amendment across Moffat County.

Under the amendment, Ulrich said, only 8 percent of Moffat County’s population would see an increase in income taxes, and those are people who earn $150,000 or more per year. Additionally, he said, Colorado has the fourth-lowest concentration of C corporations in the nation, and the amendment would raise taxes on such corporations by 1.37 percent. Statewide, the tax increase would raise an estimated $1.6 billion annually, specifically for education.

As an example, Ulrich said that for the Moffat County School District to generate funds equal to those the amendment would supply, it would have to ask voters for a 6.9 percent mill increase, something he said he never wants to do.

The school district would use the money based on community needs, Ulrich said. Examples of such needs include programs supporting mental health and safety, as well as more opportunities for students.

Commissioner Ray Beck said he encourages county residents to do their own research into the ballot issues to make an informed decision, adding the county will try to remain neutral on all ballot issues.

In other business, county commissioners:

• Accepted a bid of $20,250 from from Intrawest, a Fountain-based company, for landfill tire disposal. Other bids came from Colorado Tire Recycler, a Denver-based company, for $19,375; and Liberty Tire Recycling, a Utah-based company, for $29,700.

• Approved a grant from Colorado Department of Local Affairs for $10,000 to fund cleaning at the Irish Canyon Rest Stop.

• Approved an agreement with Ellen Dana to clean the restrooms at Irish Canyon Rest Stop for $300 per month for a term of six months. Natural Resources Department head Jeff Comstock said that, after meeting with the Bureau of Land Management — which manages the rest stop — both agreed the county should help, and it was a reasonable request. The county wants the restrooms to operate even during winter months, because they are important to visitors in the area. Commissioner Don Cook added Dana is not a county employee, but rather an independent contractor.

• Signed a proclamation declaring Sept. 17 through 23 as Constitution Week. Daughters of the American Revolution Augusta Wallihan Chapter member Ann Dodd said it is fitting for Americans to remember the important document, which helped define the nation.

• Approved a letter of support to apply for a grant from the NRA Foundation to help make improvements on the trap shooting field a few miles west of Craig.

Craig firefighters raise more than $8K during Fill the Boot campaign

CRAIG — Firefighter boots filled with spare change overflowed as the community helped to raise $8,420.11 in support of the Muscular Dystrophy Association. 

The effort “raised the highest amount to date,” said Krystal Price, whose son, JP Price, has Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

With the help of more than 100,000 firefighters across the county, in a tradition that began in 1954, MDA is “Giving Muscular Dystrophy the Boot.” The organization uses funds for research, care centers, to send kids with muscular dystrophy to summer camp, and to support local families facing the disease.

“For more than 60 years, Fill the Boot has been a strong firefighter tradition, giving families with muscular dystrophy in hometowns across America hope for the future and support for today,” according to firefighters.mda.org website.

Muscular dystrophy is a group of genetic diseases that cause progressive weakness and loss of muscle mass.

About one-third of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy — the most common form — don’t have a family history of the disease, possibly because the gene involved may be subject to sudden abnormal change — spontaneous mutation, according to the Mayo Clinic.

There’s no cure for muscular dystrophy, but medications and therapy can help manage symptoms and slow the progress of the disease.

“Firefighters have played a major role in funding research for muscular dystrophy and in the last year, three promising new drugs received FDA approval,” states firefighters.mda.org.

Contact Sasha Nelson at 970-875-1794 or snelson@CraigDailyPress.com.

Janet Sheridan: While others frolicked     

"Remember," Mom said, "I want the washing finished and the young ones happy when I get home." Then, she escaped out the door, leaving me with a mountain of dirty clothes and three unabashedly disorderly siblings.

I headed to the basement, leaving Barbara, Blaine, and JL at the breakfast table making up inane jokes, then laughing inordinately: "Knock, knock." "Who’s there?" "Janet." "Janet who?" "Janet’s stupid!"

I descended six stairs to the cement-floored laundry room with its sluggish floor drain and musty smell. Sighing with self-pity, I inserted a hose into the washtub of our antique wringer washer, turned on the water, adjusted it to warm, and dumped in a measure of grainy detergent.

Wrinkling my nose with distaste when I dealt with other people's underwear, I methodically sorted the laundry into piles of dark, white, and light until loud wails summoned me to the kitchen. The boys having disappeared, an anguished Barbara sat alone, sobbing and saying she knew she shouldn't leave the table until she finished her oatmeal, but a fly had landed in it, and she couldn't take another bite. I told her I wasn't about to fall for that old trick and thumped her to reinforce the message.

When I returned to my task, the washtub was about to overflow. Grabbing the hose, I inserted it in the rinse tub, then scooped a couple of bucketfuls of excess water from the washtub and, deciding a few suds wouldn't matter, added them to the rinse water. As I put a load of whites into the wash water and engaged the agitator, suspicious sounds again issued from the kitchen.

The little boys were wrestling, knocking into the chair where a sad-eyed Barbara still sat. To my amazement, she had managed to capture a fly and drown it in her oatmeal. I told her to get out of my sight before I made her eat it like a raisin. She escaped, and I sent the boys outside to ride their beat-up tricycle, ignoring their protests that it had no front tire. Maybe riding on the rim would build muscle somewhere other than between their ears.

The rinse tub full, I now had to deal with the dreaded wringer. Dad had warned us about washing-machine wringers that mangled the arms of wee children, and for the rest of their lives, they had to be fed like baby birds. We still had our arms, but Carolyn once forced two pair of jeans into the wringer and stalled it. Then, the weight of the wet denim broke the wringer free from its locked position, so it began rotating on its axis in circles, the levis flying out like arms on a horizontal windmill. We played a thrilling game of dodge the jeans until Lawrence, the first of us to gain any sense of maturity, came to investigate and ruined our fun.

I hated inserting small items like stockings and handkerchiefs into the wringer, because they sometimes failed to exit obediently on the other side of the rollers, so they continued to go around and around. Theory dictated stopping the wringer, popping a roller, and removing the stocking. Daring demanded snatching one end of it without wringing your fingers and hanging on until the offending item unwound.

Finally, the first load wrung into the rinse water, and a second load chugging in the soapy water, I checked on the terrible trio. I found them playing in the yard and told Barbara throwing rocks in the air and telling her little brothers to run under them was proof she'd been adopted. All three looked at me with puzzlement, then headed for the garden, where they'd pick and eat green gooseberries.

Soon, the sheets were wrung into the laundry basket, and the other loads were progressing in an orderly fashion. Carolyn had been told to hang the wet laundry when she returned from babysitting, so I'd soon be sitting on the porch, enjoying another Bobbsey Twins book in which chores didn't exist, older children went adventuring, and younger children obeyed without question.

Sheridan's book, "A Seasoned Life Lived in Small Towns," is available in Craig at Downtown Books and Steamboat Springs at Off the Beaten Path Bookstore. She also blogs at auntbeulah.com the first and 15th of every month.

Lance Scranton: It’s gotta be true!

A long time ago, when I was a wee lad and I had all of my future well out in front of me, something happened. I can't really say what it was, because as embarrassing episodes go, this one was a doozy! But suffice it to say I learned a lesson, was disappointed in myself, and hoped it wouldn't be held against me as I moved forward with my life. Unlike some, I remained imperfect and made a few more mistakes along the way as I grew to maturity and realized that, at some point, my youthful indiscretions would amount to a reputation I wouldn't want to have should I continue.

Time went on, and I began to grow, mature, and look back on my actions as a time when I learned some valuable lessons and began to formulate some type of mature code for living. Many of the things I did when I was in Junior high and high school were just plain stupid, and being surrounded by fellow stupid people — stupidity tended to abound in many areas of life. But somehow, I made it through and became an adult with career aspirations and a lifestyle that reflected a more mature approach to life.

But, in all of the things I did as a teenager in high school, wrapped up in the frenzied era of the '80s, and in all the excesses and time youth affords, I am certain I did something to hurt people in some way, shape, or form. I'm certain I was selfish. I'm absolutely positive I made bad decisions. I'm confident I mishandled situations, and I'm forever embarrassed about some things I wish I hadn't done.

So, if you are like me and you wish you had done things differently as you look back across the years, I offer you the same advice I give my students should they care to listen: Sometimes, life can get the best of us, and we can get caught up in things that we regret later and may regret for the rest of our lives. But, people have this amazing capacity to forgive, and time can sometimes appease some of the bitterness that hurt can cause.

Being young is difficult, and we can make bad decisions, but if you own up to your mistakes and do your best to move in a better direction, your life can get better, and your capacity to make better decisions will grow exponentially.

It's gotta be true that we've all made mistakes. It's also gotta be true that we need to learn to live in the light of hoping we can each become better people if what we have done serves to teach us instead of consuming us.

It's gotta be true that, as messy as life can get sometimes, we all deserve a chance at redemption. It's gotta be true that what is true about each of us is that the truth does set us free from the bondage of fear and regret.

But, it's gotta be true, or it only serves to tear us down and destroy those of us who have learned from our past and lived lives in light of the truth of our imperfections.

But, it's gotta be true.

Lance Scranton is a teacher and coach at Moffat County High School.

Business Buzz: Economic Development Principles & Practices slated for Monday

Craig/Moffat Economic Development Partnership is hosting Economic Development Principles & Practices from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24, at the Moffat County Fairgrounds Pavilion.

The agenda for the event includes Economic Development 101, presented by Laura Lewis Marchino, CEcD, executive director of Region 9 Economic Development District. CMEDP Executive Director Michelle Perry will present a report overview from the Business Opportunity Toolkit project and host a workshop discussion for implementation steps and local incentives.

Perry said the ideal audience for the event includes elected officials, board members, staff, and community members interested in economic development opportunities in Craig and Moffat County.

“This is a great opportunity to understand the foundational elements that make a strong economic development program and direct our implementation of the steps outlined in our soon-to-be-released toolkit,” Perry said.

The event is free, and lunch will be served. RSVPs are required by Sept. 19 to director@cmedp.comFor more information, contact 970-620-4370 or director@cmedp.com.

Chamber Mixer to be hosted by Moffat County Fuller Center for Housing Thursday

The Craig Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors will hold a business after-hours mixer, hosted by the Moffat County Fuller Center for Housing, from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, to celebrate the completion of a project house at 731 Yampa Ave. The home will also be transferred to its new owner during the event.

Attend to learn more about the Moffat County Fuller Center, mingle chamber members while enjoying fun, food, and prizes.

The event will be held at 731 Yampa Ave. For more information or to RSVP, contact the Craig Chamber of Commerce at 970-824-5689 or info@craig-chamber.com.

Home buyer class slated for Tuesday

A free home buyer class will be conducted by Paul McGilton, of Guild Mortgage Company, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 25, at 318 W. Victory Way. The event promises "great information" for both first-time home buyers or the seasoned investor. Soda and water will also be provided.

RSVPs are needed by 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24.

Digital marketing workshop scheduled Thursday

Businesspersons, nonprofit leaders, and community members are invited to "Digital Marketing Fundamentals," from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, in Room 185 at Colorado Northwestern Community College, 2801 W. Ninth St.

The event is hosted by Colorado Small Business Development Center and Craig/Moffat Economic Development Partnership, with presenters from Animas Marketing of Durango.

The agenda includes how to use search engine optimization tactics to increase customer acquisition and how to leverage social media for business growth.

The cost is $15 and includes lunch.

To register, visit coloradosbdc.org/training. For more information, call 970-620-4370.

Business consultants sought, invited to orientation

Craig/Moffat Economic Development Partnership is seeking experienced businesspersons to serve as Colorado Small Business Development Center consultants.

Local consultants are paid for their time, and their service allows the organizations to offer free, confidential consultations to start-up and growing companies.

"Serving as a consultant is a meaningful way to make a difference in our local economy," CMEDP Executive Director Michelle Perry said. "We seek to work with local businesspeople with experience in their field and passion for helping others. If that sounds like you, I hope you will consider serving in this rewarding role."

Those interested may learn more by attending an informational session from noon to 1 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4, in Room 185 at Colorado Northwestern Community College, 2801 W. Ninth St.

RSVP to director@cmedp.com. For more information, call Perry at 970-620-4370.

Horses not displaced by fire, closures remain as containment tightens on Boone Draw fire

CRAIG — Access to public lands affected by fire may reopen soon, officials indicated in a press release Monday, Sept. 17.

Fire activity on Boone Draw Fire has greatly reduced the past several days. Fire crews have made significant progress, achieving approximately 80 percent containment Monday as hot, dry weather is expected to continue throughout the week.

While the fire is holding at 8, 683 acres, only 202 acres are actually within the Sand Wash Basin Wild Horse Herd Management Area.

The Sand Wash herd appears not to have been significantly displaced by the fire. Firefighters have observed horses enter the burned area, drink from springs, and exit toward Sevenmile Ridge. The fire burned some fences around the HMA, and temporary fencing has been put in place in affected areas.

Along with containment, crews are focused on mopping up and repairing fire suppression impacts. Fire officials are beginning to release fire crews, as fire activity has declined, and work nears completion. Several engines were released Monday, with more crews expected to be released Tuesday and Wednesday.

County Roads and BLM lands around the fire remain closed to public entry for firefighter and public safety. BLM and Moffat County officials continue to assess the closure, with a goal of reopening access to the area as soon as possible. Visitors looking for horse viewing opportunities can access the HMA by way of Moffat County Road 75, along with the Sevenmile Ridge area north of the fire.

Visit inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6207/ for more information on the area closure.

Boone Draw Fire ignited on BLM land Thursday, Sept. 13; the cause is under investigation. No structures or other infrastructure are threatened, and the fire is burning pinyon-juniper, grass, and sage on Bureau of Land Management and private land, approximately 50 miles west of Craig.

Moffat County and BLM-administered lands within the Little Snake Field Office are under Stage 1 fire restrictions. For information visit moffatcountysheriff.com/pdf/Fire%20Restictions%20Press%20release%202018-2_Stage%201.pdf.