Prescribed burns planned in northern Routt County | CraigDailyPress.com

Prescribed burns planned in northern Routt County

Steamboat Today staff

Steamboat Springs — Routt National Forest fire crews are planning to conduct multiple prescribed burns this fall near Crane Park in northern Routt County. — Routt National Forest fire crews are planning to conduct multiple prescribed burns this fall near Crane Park in northern Routt County.

— Routt National Forest fire crews are planning to conduct multiple prescribed burns this fall near Crane Park in northern Routt County.

The Little Snake North burn unit consists of 800 acres and is located 32 miles north of Steamboat Springs and five miles south of the Wyoming border. The project will be implemented in phases, with the initial burn taking place as early as Thursday, Oct. 1 on 274 acres.

Crane Park is west of Forest Road 550, north of Forest Road 503, and east of Routt County Road 129. The burns will take place on Forest Service lands managed by the Hahns Peak-Bears Ears Ranger District.

According to a U.S. Forest Service news release, crews will use drip torches to carry out burning operations over the course of two days. Suitable weather and fuel moisture will determine the exact date of this burn.

This particular burn unit is comprised of a mix of mountain shrubs, grasses and aspen. Smoke may be visible from some areas during burning operations but should subside each evening. U.S. Forest Service fire crews will monitor the burned area following operations until the fire is safely out.

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Smoke from all prescribed fires is closely monitored to ensure that the conditions for smoke dispersal, developed in collaboration with the Colorado Air Pollution and Control Division, are being met. These conditions reduce the likelihood of undesired smoke impacts.

The Little Snake North burns are designed primarily to improve wildlife habitat for deer and elk but will also provide a secondary benefit of removing hazardous fuels.

Successfully reducing fuels now will help make future potential wildland fire management efforts in this area more safe and effective.

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