Craig briefs: Museum of Northwest Colorado to host show | CraigDailyPress.com

Craig briefs: Museum of Northwest Colorado to host show

The Gnome's Traveling Fly Rod Show comes to the Museum of Northwest Colorado from Thursday through May 8. Colorado native Jeff Hatton includes fishing rods from the late 1700s through the mid 1900s in this extensive display of antique fishing rods. A special free presentation: "An Irreverent Look at the History of Fly Fishing" by Jeff Hatton at 4 p.m. Thursday. The Museum of Northwest Colorado in Downtown Craig is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday  Admission is free.

Senior Social Center hosts movie night Thursday

The Senior Social Center will host a Thursday Movie Matinee this week at the CNCC Bell tower. The doors open at 1 p.m. and the movie starts at 1:30 p.m. sharp. There will be popcorn and a variety of beverages. Bring a friend or two or three. A small donation would be appreciated. Questions, contact 970-326-3188 or info@seniorsocial

center.org.

Average gas prices drop slightly across state

Average retail gasoline prices in Colorado have fallen 0.7 cents per gallon in the past week, averaging $2.23 per gallon on Sunday, according to GasBuddy's daily survey of 2,158 gas outlets in Colorado. This compares with the national average, which has fallen 2.4 cents per gallon in the past week to $2.43 per gallon, according to gasoline price website http://www.gasbuddy.com.

Including the change in gas prices in Colorado during the past week, prices at the beginning of the week were 136.3 cents per gallon lower than the same day one year ago and are 16.7 cents per gallon higher than a month ago. The national average has increased 18 cents per gallon during the past month and stands 109.3 cents per gallon lower than this day one year ago.

"After March came in like a lion at the pump, things are beginning to cool down, especially in hardest hit areas in the West," Patrick DeHaan, GasBuddy senior petroleum analyst, said in a statement. "Crude oil prices closed last week nearing their January lows on news of plentiful crude oil inventories, which maybe begin to weigh on gasoline prices, once refineries conclude maintenance and throttle up utilization rates. In the end, it could mean even lower gasoline prices for motorists during the summer than GasBuddy previously expected, barring other refinery issues or unpredictable issues."

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States seeing the largest drop in gas prices versus one year ago:

■ Colorado, down $1.37/gallon

■ Indiana, down $1.52 a gallon

■ Michigan, down $1.47 a gallon

■ Ohio, down $1.47 a gallon

■ Illinois, down $1.38 a gallon

CDOT launches moving state toward zero deaths

Monday marked the beginning of a new era for transportation safety in Colorado.  Gov. John Hickenlooper joined state and national officials to announce Moving Colorado Towards Zero Deaths, which sets a bold and visionary goal of zero deaths for every individual, family and community using Colorado's transportation network.

"We are announcing this ambitious goal today to dramatically reduce transportation deaths in Colorado, as we know that even one death is one too many," Hickenlooper said at a ceremony today at the Capitol. "This new vision serves as a wake-up call to any who have become complacent about the number of traffic deaths in Colorado each year."  

In 2013, there were 481 traffic deaths in Colorado; there was 480 deaths in 2014.  

Moving Towards Zero Deaths is a core value of the state's new Strategic Highway Safety Plan, which provides innovative and data-driven approaches to improving highway safety.

"As a father of an 18-month-old daughter, I am reminded every day of the value of every life in our state. The strategies in this new safety plan show immense promise in helping us reach zero deaths," Shailen Bhatt, executive director of CDOT said in a statement.

To demonstrate and measure progress, the new vision sets realistic interim goals, including reducing fatalities from 548 in 2008 to 416 by 2019.  

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