Four city council members and one new mayor will help fill the seats at Craig City Hall.

Photo by Sasha Nelson

Four city council members and one new mayor will help fill the seats at Craig City Hall.

2017 Election Guide: Q&A with Craig City Council and mayoral candidates

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— On April 4, Craig voters will have the chance to choose a new mayor and four City Council members. Nine candidates are vying for the opportunity to make their mark on Craig’s future. The Craig Daily Press posed them all a series of questions. Here’s what they had to say:

Mayoral candidates

Joe Bird

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Joe Bird

CDP: What is one action you would take to spur economic development, including how it could be implemented?

Bird: We spur economic development based on infrastructure and events in development or already in place. For instance, combining the River Project, airport, restaurants, golf course and Loudy-Simpson to create an atmosphere of tourism, business and culture.

I will relentlessly work with event coordinators, the Local Marketing District, Moffat County Tourism Association, Craig/Moffat Economic Development Partnership (CMEDP), private investors, elected officials, business owners and community stakeholders in numerous capacities. With remarkable new leadership in this community, we must listen to their ideas.

Assessments constantly indicate the need for a vibrant and thriving downtown. Time to stop assessing and start locating funding that will enhance downtown. Let’s pursue grant funding and matching dollars. Revitalizing downtown, tourism promotion and increased community pride will be the first steps in retaining existing businesses and attracting new.

CDP: With more than 200,000 square feet of empty commercial space in Craig, how would you propose we fill it?

Bird: The authentic question is how do we get more businesses to generate tax dollars? Let’s streamline the planning and zoning process through implementing packages that expedite and ease burdens on businesses for opening or expanding within city limits.

We must aggressively promote, grow and attract entrepreneurship through collaboration with building owners, realtors, banks and officials. It’s time to stop hindering business and take full advantage of the Rural Jump Start Program. The city, county and CMEDP must partner to attract non-competing businesses to Craig.

Through exploring incentives similar to existing programs, such as Castle Rock’s collaboration with their city, this can be accomplished. Through Castle Rock’s program, if the city participates financially in assisting businesses, they use performance-based criteria that guarantees a return on investment.

City funding to businesses is the last money in — banks and company financing is already in place. Funding, through the form of a loan, is only used for primary job creation. This loan is forgiven as jobs are created. If jobs do not prove to be permanent the loan must be repaid.

The amount of the city’s investment depends on jobs created and wages paid. This program, additional tax-breaks and incentives are ways to attract business, generate revenue and fill buildings.

CDP: We’ve heard repeatedly that the city has already trimmed the budget as much as possible without cutting back on more staff and services. If the sales and use tax measure doesn’t pass, what solution would you pursue to fix the budget crunch?

Bird: For Craig to maintain our services at current levels, revenue generation, collaboration, consolidation and tough decisions must transpire. It’s time to think outside of the box. Regardless of Ballot Issue 1A, we have to actively look for ways to generate revenue.

Our community has to have a “shop Craig first” mentality and leakage of outside sales must stop. Let’s advocate for a flat tax on online purchases to continue proportionately spreading taxes amongst numerous categories and individuals — usage, occupancy, sales, property, etc.

I will keep up conversations with the county in consolidation of services — e.g. the city managing Loudy-Simpson — and look to unite and collaborate with various businesses for shared services and expenses.

We must reduce redundancy, consolidate and eliminate overlapping services. These efforts will not fail, but as your mayor I am willing to make tough decisions as to where additional cuts may come from.

CDP: Regarding the retail marijuana ordinance that recently came before council, do you believe it’s council’s job to judge the merit of such ballot measures or that council should turn it over to voters to decide?

Bird: As an elected official, I swore an oath to uphold the federal and state constitution, and according to President Trump and his staff, retail marijuana is against the law.

As a city representative, it is not my responsibility to facilitate breaking federal laws and call it “voter’s rights.” The 15th Amendment is for race, color and servitude, not for a subject matter that gets put on a ballot.

Officials are also charged with being educated in our decisions before we do anything that can affect the wellbeing of our community as a whole. Everything needs taken into consideration and not acted upon purely out of emotion.

CDP: In one word or phrase, what quality or skill would you bring to the job, if elected?

Bird: Integrity-focused and community-driven.

John Ponikvar

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John Ponikvar

CDP: What is one action you would take to spur economic development, including how it could be implemented?

Ponikvar: I will be "business friendly." Too many times over the years businesses were discouraged from development before their ideas even got to the city manager or planning and zoning.

Craig must be business friendly and provide great customer service. The city manager and mayor can make sure that all community resources are available and easily accessible.

Regulations should encourage growth, instead of being expensive and restrictive. Colorado Northwestern Community College and Memorial Regional Health will be big economic drivers for our community, and we need to make sure that needless regulations do not hinder or minimize their, or any other business wanting to grow in Craig.

CDP: With more than 200,000 square feet of empty commercial space in Craig, how would you propose we fill it?

Ponikvar: The city manager, economic development director and city council will research business that are compatible and needed in Craig then move forward to lobby and encourage their investment in our community. We will go to the businesses to promote the attributes and lifestyle Craig can offer.

CDP: We’ve heard repeatedly that the city has already trimmed the budget as much as possible without cutting back on more staff and services. If the sales and use tax measure doesn’t pass, what solution would you pursue to fix the budget crunch?

Ponikvar: Short-term, capital projects will have to be reduced, vehicle replacement times will be extended and frequency of chip sealing of the streets will be lengthened.

City and county officials will collaborate and consolidate departments to maximize revenues. This past year, City Council set aside funds to be used for economic development. These funds will be used to leverage grants for infrastructure.

Long-term, we need to be business friendly, encourage and not discourage development and support local business. We are told that a dollar spent in the community goes around seven times. As those dollars are spent, they create tax revenue for the city and more jobs. Every job brings more spending, and this is how we can grow and minimize the problems we currently have.

CDP: Regarding the retail marijuana ordinance that recently came before council, do you believe it’s council’s job to judge the merit of such ballot measures or that council should turn it over to voters to decide?

Ponikvar: Government has a chain of command — in Craig it starts with the citizens, followed by City Council, city manager, department heads, etc.

Generally, council members receive input from a very small number of people in the community. A topic as controversial as marijuana deserves as much input as possible. There are 8,846 residents in the City of Craig. Council needs to hear from as many of those citizens as possible. A vote by our bosses, the citizens, is the only way to do that.

Ethically, we represent the whole community, not just those that hold the same values as us individually. To deny the right to vote is to deny the value each and every individual brings to the community. As elected officials we trust that citizens will do their research and vote for the best candidates. They deserve the same respect and trust with this issue.

CDP: In one word or phrase, what quality or skill would you bring to the job, if elected?

Ponikvar: Knowledge and extensive experience.

Craig City Council Candidates

Andrea Camp

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Andrea Camp

CDP: What is one action you would take to spur economic development, including how it could be implemented?

Camp: As a City Council member, I would work with existing business owners and business leaders to discuss ways to help improve our business climate. CMEDP and the Chamber of Commerce recently sent a business survey and those results can help shape decisions moving forward.

I believe that small business owners can have a big impact on our economy if we can attract the right kind of business that can pay a living wage to our residents. We have a lot to offer a location-neutral business if we can provide the services needed to operate their business from home.

Improving the appearance of our community by joining efforts with our business owners, community leaders and residents will make Craig more appealing for a business looking to locate here. I am excited about the opportunity to work together to improve our local economy by recruiting potential businesses and growing our current businesses.

CDP: With more than 200,000 square feet of empty commercial space in Craig, how would you propose we fill it?

Camp: I would determine businesses that could benefit by operating in Craig and Moffat County. The Rural Jump Start program could present a great opportunity for a business unlike others in our community to locate here and benefit from the incentives of the program.

I want to try to contact potential businesses that could fill some of our empty spaces due to business closings. Those empty spaces could be appealing as the work, including building, parking lots and landscaping, is already finished and could make it more cost effective to a start-up business.

I would want to collaborate with other community leaders to create a list of potential businesses we could contact regarding the incentives we have to offer. City Council also needs to be aware of ordinances that may have a negative impact on business relocation. If the planning and zoning requirements are too rigid and don’t allow for some flexibility that may force a business to look at other communities.

I understand a need for consistency in certain areas regarding streets and sidewalks, but some areas will allow for flexibility on a case by case basis.

CDP: We’ve heard repeatedly that the city has already trimmed the budget as much as possible without cutting back on more staff and services. If the sales and use tax measure doesn’t pass, what solution would you pursue to fix the budget crunch?

Camp: Cuts would be spread across all the departments to lessen the overall impact. Unfortunately, the main expense of the general fund is personnel, and if personnel is cut that impacts the services provided.

I would look at ways to reduce staff over time through attrition when possible. I know that staff cuts must be considered carefully as not to impact the overall operations and efficiency. Services would also be cut by looking at those with the least impact, sadly our Parks & Recreation Department would likely be impacted the most.

Programs would be cut based on the number of residents served, those with the least participation or impact would be considered first. Capital projects will also be cut or postponed as they have been over the past several years. Only necessary capital projects will be funded on a case by case basis.

I do not believe that we can cut our way to a balanced budget without seriously impacting the services that we expect the City to provide.

CDP: Regarding the retail marijuana ordinance that recently came before council, do you believe it’s council’s job to judge the merit of such ballot measures or that council should turn it over to voters to decide?

Camp: I think the retail marijuana decision should be voted on by the citizens. I believe it is City Council’s responsibility to ensure that the ordinances regarding retail marijuana are enforceable and fit within the city’s requirements.

The City Council needs to be involved in this process through the city attorney to ensure the interests of the community and citizens are being met. I realize as a member of City Council, I am elected to represent citizens on both sides of the issue and am willing to engage in those discussions.

CDP: In one word or phrase, what quality or skill would you bring to the job, if elected?

Camp: Determination to improve the future of our community to benefit all.

Bill Johnston

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Bill Johnston

CDP: What is one action you would take to spur economic development, including how it could be implemented?

Johnston: Get all the local groups and experts in a room with the end goal of jointly creating one solid action that all can agree on, assign tasks with completion dates and have a follow-up meeting to evaluate the progress. Do this each time one action is completed until it becomes a habit.

CDP: With more than 200,000 square feet of empty commercial space in Craig, how would you propose we fill it?

Johnston: Re-contact all the businesses that had been turned down or became frustrated with all the difficulties and road blocks created by the previous building department. Let them know that we have retail space available and that we are new business-friendly.

CDP: We’ve heard repeatedly that the city has already trimmed the budget as much as possible without cutting back on more staff and services. If the sales and use tax measure doesn’t pass, what solution would you pursue to fix the budget crunch?

Johnston: Have a marathon budget meeting with the city manager and his staff. First, revenues are estimated as close as possible. Re-defined priorities are agreed to and a new budget is established in order of priorities. As the revenues are used up, items that are very low on the priority list would be postponed or cancelled.

CDP: Regarding the retail marijuana ordinance that recently came before council, do you believe it’s council’s job to judge the merit of such ballot measures or that council should turn it over to voters to decide?

Johnston: When a question comes before the council and it is so divided by the public comments and by the council members themselves, it is incumbent upon the elected officials to put the question to the voters in order to settle the question democratically.

CDP: In one word or phrase, what quality or skill would you bring to the job, if elected?

Johnston: Experience with large budgets, large groups of employees and with Craig City Council.

Chris Nichols

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Chris Nichols

CDP: What is one action you would take to spur economic development, including how it could be implemented?

Nichols: Work with the city and county to create an incentive list that could be used to recruit new business. The incentives given and how much would be based on a sliding scale using how much sales tax generated, number of new employees, and wage scale of jobs created.

Incentives could include land, taxes and fee rebates and could start low and increase over time or as sales grew.

After creating incentives, representatives of the city and county need to attend trade shows and conventions to showcase our community. Armed with incentives and the new business opportunity toolkit that the Chamber and EDP are working on, our community stands a much better chance attracting new business.

CDP: With more than 200,000 square feet of empty commercial space in Craig, how would you propose we fill it?

Nichols: I was given an article where a small rural community in Minnesota had vacant rundown buildings around the community. A group of the community members got together and formed a co-operative, the first of its kind in the US.

The co-op pools member money to invest in local commercial real estate. The community members own the property collectively as part of investing in the co-op. The group increased its memberships until they could purchase one of the community's most rundown buildings and asked the community what business they wanted to see there and needed someone to operate the business.

The co-op helped with renovations and structured rent to help the business succeed. They had enough success that now they have three businesses employing 25 people. Any community member can join by investing.

I think this is a new and great concept to model. This gives the entire community opportunity to participate in growing our town with having a say working within the co-op structure.

What we are doing has not worked. This concept with the new business opportunity toolkit gives more opportunities to local business to stay and grow. It also allows everyone to participate in growing Craig.

Let’s not find ways to make this not work but instead find ways to make it work here. It’s working in other communities, small and large.

CDP: We’ve heard repeatedly that the city has already trimmed the budget as much as possible without cutting back on more staff and services. If the sales and use tax measure doesn’t pass, what solution would you pursue to fix the budget crunch?

Nichols: If the 2018 budget remains flat with current 2017 projections, that amount would completely deplete the city's emergency fund balance. The 2018 budgeted amount would need a 15 percent across-the-board cut to maintain that fund balance, which is the correct way to budget keeping a reserve.

I would study the efficiencies of combining city and county law enforcement if it could be done without jeopardizing services or increasing response times. If feasible, apply any saving gained to the budget.

Next, look at what’s needed to cut total budget a total amount of 15 percent in remaining departments.

That approach or increasing revenues is the only way to make the budget work.

CDP: Regarding the retail marijuana ordinance that recently came before council, do you believe it’s council’s job to judge the merit of such ballot measures or that council should turn it over to voters to decide?

Nichols: If retail/recreational marijuana is to continue as a state’s rights issue, I feel we don’t know what we don’t know on its legalization effects.

Statewide and neighboring communities are now reporting on social/economic issues like increased ER visits due to the lack of knowledge on the effects of edibles, 150 percent increase in DUI arrests statewide and increased homeless rates in Denver.

I would propose to form a panel of community members, proponents, opponents, educators and law enforcement to compile the effects of legalization and create an implementation plan. Then and only then, if the ballot wording requires a percentage of tax revenues created by the sales be spent on drug abuse awareness and law enforcement, would I vote to turn it to the voters to decide.

Dave DeRose

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Dave DeRose

CDP: What is one action you would take to spur economic development, including how it could be implemented?

DeRose: One action will not cure the problems. It will take effort in marketing, gardening, recruitment. City Council must commit to supporting the effort with funding, action and be personally involved with the movement.

One effort is to inventory what businesses can grow that exist, any business in any industry.

CDP: With more than 200,000 square feet of empty commercial space in Craig, how would you propose we fill it?

DeRose: Property owners will have to sense a spirit of cooperation and concern from council. That will take interaction with the city to address this issue.

It is time to be involved with the future economy of Craig and to fill these spaces. This will take commitment from all parties to make this happen.

Our community must finally realize that the closing of Safeway and Kmart were also affected by national economics and not just local economics.

CDP: We’ve heard repeatedly that the city has already trimmed the budget as much as possible without cutting back on more staff and services. If the sales and use tax measure doesn’t pass, what solution would you pursue to fix the budget crunch?

DeRose: Having monitored sales tax revenues for the last nine to 10 years, I can see this trend has been in the works for the last four years or so. If the tax does not pass, the job of council will be more difficult.

There are no magic bullets, but budgets can be managed and we will have to work with the staff and community to make the cuts we will need. I hope we do not need to do that, but having done that in my own business in 2009 I feel confident we can with the least disruption possible.

Please vote yes on 1A.

CDP: Regarding the retail marijuana ordinance that recently came before council, do you believe it’s council’s job to judge the merit of such ballot measures or that council should turn it over to voters to decide?

DeRose: Council spent several months on 1A. I would like to see information from law enforcement, medical services, educators, proponents and opponents on this issue.

Let’s deal with facts. We should create a group to find those facts. If council is to lead, we will need to operate from an informed position. With facts uncovered, the community can decide.

CDP: In one word or phrase, what quality or skill would you bring to the job, if elected?

DeRose: Willingness to serve and experience.

Jarrod Odgen

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Jarrod Ogden

CDP: What is one action you would take to spur economic development, including how it could be implemented?

Odgen: I believe that Craig and Moffat County have some of the best outdoor recreation available in the state, including but not limited to the Yampa River, Elkhead Reservoir, Browns Park, Loudy-Simpson Park, hunting and fishing, snowmobiling, etc.

We need to capitalize on this industry that is so abundant but to date has barely had the surface scratched.

In the recent past we have established the Local Marketing District, which has been tasked with marketing our beloved community to the rest of the world.

One of the LMD’s questions to the City Council and (Moffat County) Commissioners was, “What is Craig and Moffat County’s label?”. In other words, “who are we?” My response to them was, “the great outdoors”.

If we keep moving in this positive direction, come together as a whole community and support/embrace this outdoors movement, I believe we can establish an entirely new and sustainable source of revenue for generations to come.

CDP: With more than 200,000 square feet of empty commercial space in Craig, how would you propose we fill it?

Odgen: If we can capitalize on the outdoors movement I stated above, then we should be able to fill a large portion of the empty commercial space we currently have in Craig.

Also as a city, we need to be willing and able to look at the current planning and zoning regulations and be flexible when it comes to new industries trying to establish new businesses in the community.

We also need to continue to support our local, already established businesses so that they can continue to grow in our new, more diverse economy. We have to grow with new business while at the same time not forgetting about the existing businesses that have helped us get to this point.

CDP: We’ve heard repeatedly that the city has already trimmed the budget as much as possible without cutting back on more staff and services. If the sales and use tax measure doesn’t pass, what solution would you pursue to fix the budget crunch?

Odgen: Once again I would like to refer you to the abundant outdoors that we are surrounded by. Whether the ballet question on taxes passes or not, we have got to start investing in the opportunities we have in our own back yard.

The reality is that if we don’t get the tax measure passed, that we will be faced with some hard decisions. Services will have to be looked at again and the City will also have to reevaluate all departments for any cost-saving possibilities.

The City of Craig has not raised sales tax for quite some time, but I do believe it is necessary to do so to maintain the services and quality of life that we as residence have all come to enjoy.

CDP: Regarding the retail marijuana ordinance that recently came before council, do you believe it’s council’s job to judge the merit of such ballot measures or that council should turn it over to voters to decide?

Odgen: I believe whole-heartedly that it is absolutely the right of all the citizens and voters to decide whether or not Craig should allow a marijuana ordinance of any kind within the city.

It’s no secret, nor am I ashamed that I, Jarrod Ogden as a council member voted to allow the people of Craig to have the right to vote on such measures.

As a current council member and proud resident of Craig, I believe that it is my responsibility to objectively look at all potential revenue generators and not simply raise my nose to any of them because of my own beliefs.

CDP: In one word or phrase, what quality or skill would you bring to the job, if elected?

Odgen: Honesty and experience

Rod Compton

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Rod Compton

CDP: What is one action you would take to spur economic development, including how it could be implemented?

Compton: I would propose a long-range strategic task force be put together to begin the process of building a vision for the next 20 years. What do we want Craig to look like and how can we accomplish the goals?

We need five-, 10- and 20-year plans. Someone once said, “If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time.”

This task force should include, but not be limited to, representatives of EDP, Chamber (of Commerce), The Memorial Hospital, CNCC, Board of Realtors, Moffat County School Board, Moffat County Tourism, Downtown Business Association, Boys & Girls Club, the County Commissioners, and the Craig City Council.

To build the infrastructure, technology and opportunities for new business and growing the businesses we have, we must plan to succeed.

CDP: With more than 200,000 square feet of empty commercial space in Craig, how would you propose we fill it?

Compton: One option is to remove ordinances of the past that are keeping businesses from wanting to move here. Tax incentives and economic opportunity can excite new business.

When the atmosphere of this city becomes “grow” and not “keep everything like it is,” then we will see other businesses take a good look at opening their stores here.

CDP: We’ve heard repeatedly that the city has already trimmed the budget as much as possible without cutting back on more staff and services. If the sales and use tax measure doesn’t pass, what solution would you pursue to fix the budget crunch?

Compton: Hopefully, the citizens of Craig will see the need and importance of this tax measure. We are far below other Western Slope cities.

But, if it doesn’t pass, the reality of the budget dictates what we can and cannot do for now. The line items of the budget would have to be prioritized and given a delegation of importance.

If the money is not there, we can’t use it, but that is where the long-range strategic task force would begin.

CDP: Regarding the retail marijuana ordinance that recently came before council, do you believe it’s council’s job to judge the merit of such ballot measures or that council should turn it over to voters to decide?

Compton: Our government is run by its people. When the people vote, they are saying what they want. I believe it is a fundamental right for the people to cast their votes.

The job of the City Council is to do just what the name intimates… to give leadership and counsel on issues that pertain to the city. When the people elect leaders, they should lead.

CDP: In one word or phrase, what quality or skill would you bring to the job, if elected?

Compton: Excited creativity

Tony Bohrer

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Tony Bohrer

CDP: What is one action you would take to spur economic development, including how it could be implemented?

Bohrer: Perspective is reality. I believe economic development starts at home with the businesses we have established in our community. I feel we have to be as loyal to the companies we have in this great community as we are going to be to a company wanting to move here.

Our community is full of smart, successful people who have a lot of knowledge on how to grow a company but we have seen each other as competition and not allies. We need to change our perspective and our neighbor’s perspective in believing Craig is the greatest place to live. We can change our reality by changing our perspective.

We will spur economic development on its own if we become proud of where we are living. Craig has a whole lot more good to it than it does bad.

CDP: With more than 200,000 square feet of empty commercial space in Craig, how would you propose we fill it?

Bohrer: We have already started tackling this problem. Our city manager (Mike Foreman) has already been in contact with the owners of the Kmart building and the owners of the old Safeway building to see what are the options, as well as making sure the building is being maintained.

We have to aggressively reach out to companies and if they are not willing to budge we have to hold their feet to the fire and make sure they keep their buildings maintained and looking presentable.

CDP: We’ve heard repeatedly that the city has already trimmed the budget as much as possible without cutting back on more staff and services. If the sales and use tax measure doesn’t pass, what solution would you pursue to fix the budget crunch?

Bohrer: I will start off by saying you can always cut a budget more, but with that being said, we have to be careful and make sure we are cutting away fat and not muscle. Muscle takes twice as long to grow back once cut compared to fat.

Instead of focusing on cutting the budget more, we have to continue to look for more ways to increase revenue and not always be willing to cut the budget.

This goes back to question No. 1. We need to make sure our businesses that we have in our community are healthy and thriving. If they are moving forward, the city has no other choice but to move forward.

CDP: Regarding the retail marijuana ordinance that recently came before council, do you believe it’s council’s job to judge the merit of such ballot measures or that council should turn it over to voters to decide?

Bohrer: Unlike what we have been accused of, we are all for the voters having the right to vote. But we have an obligation to make sure we are educated on every matter before turning it over for the vote.

At the time this ballot was trying to be pushed through, not one councilman or the mayor had read the 250+ pages of rules and regulation given by the state of Colorado concerning recreational marijuana.

The City Council has a job to protect while keeping the best interest of the city at mind. To push an agenda without taking the time to be educated on it ourselves is not being a good steward of the City of Craig.

If this is truly about the voter, we as the people should want all who would be affected by the outcome — good or bad depending on what side you are on — to be able to vote.

As I stated at the council meeting in January, the residents of Moffat County should have as much say as the residents of the city on this ballot measure.

This topic has been a line drawn in the sand for many groups of people, but I think we all can agree that we have to do our due diligences on educating ourselves with facts and not emotions prior to voting on a ballot measure. No matter what we are voting on.

CDP: In one word or phrase, what quality or skill would you bring to the job, if elected?

Bohrer: We are invested in this community and believe the best days of Craig are ahead not behind us.

Comments

Shaun Hadley 1 month, 1 week ago

It's unfortunate that several of these candidates thing we are too uneducated to vote on the issue of cannabis.

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Tim Kjera 1 month, 1 week ago

No Joe, No Johnston and NO USE TAX.

Does our city council have dementia or are they just hypocrites? We had a use tax and voted it out when most people realized how punitive it was when you bought a new automobile out of town. We voted it down again when it was brought up for another vote. Now it's back on the ballot for a third time. However, when asked to put recreational marijuana on the ballot, their stance is that we already voted on it.

Take note that not one of these candidates has a specific idea of what we need to do to get Craig back on its feet. It's all talk.

Here's an idea:

I would like to see the Yampa River restored to the premier fishery it once was before Parks and Wildlife started electro-shocking the Yampa River in an attempt to bring the endangered species back. How's that working? How about establishing a fish hatchery here that stocks the river with endangered species every spring and then bringing back the trout, pike and bass that were the envy of anglers across the state. It would bring people back to Craig and Moffat County to fish.

Here's another idea:

Instead of coming up with a cool slogan, "Elk Hunting Capital of the World", (whatever that means), how about we make Moffat County the envy of elk hunters everywhere by making this area a limited bull hunting area just like area 2 and 201 in the Brown's Park area. If those 2 units can produce a once-in-a-lifetime elk hunting experience, imagine what we could do in this area with even better habitat. Get Routt and Rio Blanco counties to participate. Don't just make it a slogan, make it happen. People coming for a once-in-a-lifetime hunt would spend a lot more money on guides, outfitters, packers, hotels etc. Establish winter viewing areas for the huge bulls of Moffat County and people skiing in Steamboat would be here in droves, just like they do in Jackson Hole or Estes Park. The world will beat a path to your door if you provide something that they want to see and do. Or we can continue to talk and do nothing and continue on like we usually do, because that's the way we've done it in the past. It seems like we're always looking to the past. We need to start looking to the future.

And one last thing. How about getting the street sweepers out and get rid of the dirt and grime that covers our sidewalks and roads? We haven't had much snow lately and the forecast is for more of the same. We don't have to look dirty all the time. Craig needs a good scrubbing, a fresh coat of paint and a kick in the butt.

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Mark Jacobson 1 month, 1 week ago

I'm actually impressed by what Ponikvar said here. If people bother to look up the candidates and they see this, I'm hoping they see what a good message he has.

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