Weather Watch: Dry, breezy conditions for Craig segue to thunderstorms

Advertisement

It’s going to be a restless week for Northwest Colorado, but it will still be relatively tame compared to what we can expect from summer.

Keep up with conditions in Craig

- For local weather conditions and recent coverage of Craig weather, visit craigdailypress.com/weather

- For weather information from the National Weather Service, including storm warnings and advisories, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/

- The Colorado Department of Transportation provides road conditions, closures and traffic cameras at www.cotrip.org. For travel information by phone, call 511 from anywhere in Colorado or dial 303-639-1111.

- Find information about avalanche danger and conditions at the Colorado Avalanche Information Center website: www.avalanche.state.co.us.

According to the forecast from the National Weather Service, the temperature is expected to stay in the 70s and high 60s for Craig Monday and Tuesday, with the warmth accompanied by plenty of wind, possibly reaching as much as 40 miles per hour.

John Kyle, an NWS data acquisition program manager from Grand Junction, said one concern for early this week is fire weather, though the high barometric pressure will “start to slide off to the east,” setting the stage for activity later in the week.

“It’s going to be a mostly dry and warm flow for the next couple days, but then we get into midweek and we’re going to see some disturbances as this big, open trough moves across Utah and Colorado,” he said. “With that, there’ll be some showers and that will cool things off.”

Thunderstorms are expected for Craig on Wednesday and Thursday, bringing the mercury as low as the mid-50s as an “unsettled westerly flow” keeps the weekend on the cooler side.

The amount of precipitation Craig will see is difficult to ascertain, Kyle said, though there is a good likelihood of showers, possibly even Saturday, depending on if conditions stay the same at that point.

The midweek activity and subsequent cool-down will hopefully keep fire season from starting too soon, he added. With the dryness of the area exacerbated by a southwestern flow early in the week, the atmospheric convection Wednesday will come just in time.

In the weeks to come, such events could be more hazardous.

“It’s not like midsummer, where we’re in the 90s and have a thunderstorm develop and have all kinds of lightning issues,” Kyle said.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.