Lance Scranton: Words of wisdom for kids

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I’m fairly confident in my abilities and am super-confident in my approach to my profession, as are many teachers and coaches. I have spent my life trying to pass on the values that sports taught me as I was growing up.

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Lance Scranton

I’m fairly confident in my abilities and am super-confident in my approach to my profession, as are many teachers and coaches. I have spent my life trying to pass on the values that sports taught me as I was growing up.

All of the things we talk about as educators and parents. All of the things that are important and help guide us as we get our children involved in extracurricular activities.

A colleague sent me an article to read a couple of weeks ago, and six of the writer’s words shocked me at first, and I thought, “Yes, this is important, but so are a bunch of other things.”

I really pondered the article and the words that it spoke about how our children perceive their performances. I mean, we obviously love sports and all those extracurricular activities, or we wouldn’t talk about them all the time and get our kids joined up as soon as they are old enough.

But the six words kept nagging at me, and for good reason. They were six words I had never said to my kids. Never looked them in the eye and told them. Never found the time to let them know. Never really thought about what watching them perform meant.

Anyway, I mulled over the six words and, quite frankly, when I worked up the courage to say them to one of my sons, it felt strange because it wasn’t accompanied by any qualifications or judgments on their performance.

I looked him in the eye and put my hands on his shoulders (to steady myself) and I said: “I loved watching you play today.” Nothing else, no more, just those words and I left it at that … and it was good … and he said, “Thanks, Dad.”

And I think my whole concept of sports changed that day.

Give it a try, Mom and Dad. Let the coaches do the coaching and just appreciate how your son or daughter choose to express themselves and enjoy the competition (win or lose) and make sure your child knows why you come to all those games and performances.

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