Weather Watch: Calm climate in store for Craig; river caution advised

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With the onset of summer, Northwest Colorado could use some stillness while coming out of the climate of late spring, and it looks like that’s what’s happening for the region.

Craig’s forecast from the National Weather Service this week shows little significant activity, with the thermometer hanging in the 70s through next weekend.

Keep up with conditions in Craig

- For local weather conditions and recent coverage of Craig weather, visit craigdailypress.com/weather

- For weather information from the National Weather Service, including storm warnings and advisories, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/

- The Colorado Department of Transportation provides road conditions, closures and traffic cameras at www.cotrip.org. For travel information by phone, call 511 from anywhere in Colorado or dial 303-639-1111.

- Find information about avalanche danger and conditions at the Colorado Avalanche Information Center website: www.avalanche.state.co.us.

Jeff Colton, NWS meteorologist from Grand Junction, said Sunday afternoon that the “boring” weather’s main disruption will come Tuesday, as winds start to pick up.

“There’ll be some breezy times,” he said. “There’s a little system moving across Utah into Colorado, but it doesn’t have any moisture. It may cool down temperatures a degree or two, but outside of that, no real impact."

Another system anticipated around Friday night may bring showers north of Craig, but the town itself will have little else beyond some clouds, he added.

“It’s fairly quiet, typically what we see in early June,” Colton said.

NWS continues to recommend awareness of river levels for waters across the state.

“It’s going to keep running fast and high just because we’ll be staying warm and working off that high mountain snowpack,” Colton said.

Northwest Colorado is under an NWS flood advisory through Tuesday evening, but conditions have yet to be in the emergency stages for Craig — though Routt County recently reported having issues.

Colton listed summer 2011 as an example of how dangerous the rivers can get when the burst of seasonal heat changes everything.

“We’re not seeing big problems like we did then,” he said. “This year, it just came up fast, just a lot of over-the-banks type stuff.”

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