The boy and girl (Jacob Prescott, left, and Bekah Bird, right) and their pet fish (Stephanie Duarte) in the Moffat County High School production of "The Cat in the Hat" pose a question to the audience. The play, currently in rehearsals, will run from Feb. 27 to March 1.

Photo by Andy Bockelman

The boy and girl (Jacob Prescott, left, and Bekah Bird, right) and their pet fish (Stephanie Duarte) in the Moffat County High School production of "The Cat in the Hat" pose a question to the audience. The play, currently in rehearsals, will run from Feb. 27 to March 1.

Moffat County High School to perform ‘The Cat in the Hat’

Advertisement

photo

Courtesy photo/Christina Wilcox

photo

The cast and crew of Moffat County High School's "The Cat in the Hat" gather for notes following a rehearsal.

If you go

Moffat County High School spring play — “The Cat in the Hat”

6:30 p.m. Feb 27 and 28; 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. March 1

MCHS auditorium, 900 Finley Lane

Tickets for the production are $5 per person or $10 for VIP seating and can be purchased in advance at www.moffattickets.org, which also sells hats and T-shirts related to the show. For more information, call 970-824-7036.

“The Cat in the Hat” cast list

Voiceover: Kolton Nash

Cat in the Hat: Micajah Prescott

Boy: Jacob Prescott

Girl: Bekah Bird

Fish: Stephanie Duarte

Things: Caitlin Harjes, Faith Christiansen, Wesley Atkin, Ashley Leray

Kittens: Moriah Mecham, Spencer Wilcox, Jeremy Looper, Wyeth Browning, Brittany Young, Shannon Hill

Music: Rand Reed

— One of the biggest troublemakers ever imagined soon will be unleashing his own special brand of mischief.

The Moffat County High School theater department will perform the children’s play “The Cat in the Hat,” based on the picture book by Dr. Seuss, from Feb. 27 to March 1.

The story, for the few who somehow managed not to read it growing up, follows two siblings (MCHS junior Jacob Prescott and sophomore Bekah Bird) left home alone one day when it’s too wet outside to play. Enter a rambunctious talking cat (freshman Micajah Prescott) who introduces them to a wild time they’ll never forget, including some very destructive Things.

The experience is an unusual one for Micajah, who plays a pseudo-authority figure to his own older brother. Micajah said his slightly deeper voice helped him snag the role during auditions.

“I guess I’ve just got the meow,” Micajah said.

Micajah said getting to play the iconic character — for which he insists on wearing the trademark red and white top hat even before anyone else steps into their costumes — is challenging and fun, since he is new to the drama world at MCHS.

Even so, his own fascination with the Cat in the Hat serves as an inspiration.

“I just remember being 4 years old, and I loved his whiskers,” he chuckled. “I really liked facial hair back then.”

Bird also feels a little odd as a teenager playing a little girl barely old enough for preschool. But she’s not complaining about the specifics.

“I’ve only got about three lines, but I’m onstage the entire show,” she said.

Sophomore Stephanie Duarte plays the kids’ pet fish, who tries to act as their conscience to no avail. The show is a departure from the last big production at MCHS, the November musical “Grease,” where Duarte played tough girl Rizzo.

“There’s less talking and just a lot more action and moving around,” Duarte said. “I’m excited to just see the children laugh and see their expressions.”

Rehearsals consist of a lot of brainstorming for how to make the outrageous characters even more so with plenty of exciting movements and noises.

Director Christina Wilcox encourages her cast members to each find their “ism.”

“It’s that quirk that we all have,” she said.

No two characters are quite the same, adding even more variety to a performance that will be very memorable with wigs, costumes, hairstyles and set designs that evoke the illustrations that so many in the audience will remember from their childhoods.

The play itself closes the day before the March 2 birthday of author Theodor Geisel, the birth name of Dr. Seuss, while March 3 marks the beginning of the 17th annual Read Across America literacy initiative.

Although the play is not directly tied to any reading programs, Wilcox said she hopes the show’s design and presentation will serve to honor Geisel’s goals of getting kids and their parents to crack open a book.

“It’ll be very Seussian,” Wilcox said.

Contact Andy Bockelman at 970-875-1793 or abockelman@CraigDailyPress.com.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.