Craig briefs: Labor Day is opening of small game seasons



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Colorado Parks & Wildlife encourages celebrating the holiday with any of the small game and waterfowl opportunities that kick off Monday throughout the state, according to a press release. 



CPW resources for both new and veteran hunters ensure that whether you are on the look out for doves, grouse or geese, the experience in the outdoors will be enjoyable. Find out more at http://cpw.state.co.us/thingstodo/pages/smallgame.aspx.


Colorado has more than 23 million acres of public lands, including U.S. National Forest and Bureau of Land Management lands.
Interested hunters need a current and valid photo ID, proof of residency and social security number, and a Hunter Education card, unless the hunter is born before Jan. 1, 1949, to purchase a license. Licenses also can be purchased on-line at  https://www.co.wildlifelicense.com/start.php, or by phone 1-800-244-5613.

Small game hunters are required to have a new Harvest Information Program number. Call 1-866-COLOHIP (265-6447) to begin the online registration process to obtain a new HIP number.



Last big weekend for summer traffic on I-70

The Colorado Department of Transportation is reminding drivers to anticipate heavy traffic in many areas of the state during the Labor Day weekend due to the number of events and activities taking place to finish up the summer travel season, according to a news release.  

All CDOT construction projects will be suspended statewide by late Friday afternoon to reduce potential delays. The only exception is for emergency operations. Projects will resume their regular schedule on Tuesday. 

Heavier than normal weekend traffic is expected on Interstate 25 along the Front Range and on I-70 west of Denver. More traffic than normal will travel westbound I-70 Saturday and eastbound I-70 on Labor Day, Monday, especially between Summit County and the Denver area. 

Second amendment group announces win

Castle Rock’s recent special election, one which was riddled with conflict and lawsuits, had its results certified today, according to a press release.

Both initiatives have passed, thus removing the ban on open carry on town property, limiting the power of the town manager and putting decisions on future second amendment restrictions into the hands of the citizens.

The Colorado Second Amendment Association (C2AA), formed by members of the Basic Freedom Defense Fund, which recalled Sen. John Morse in 2013, provided assistance in this effort through its Issue Committee, Freedom for Castle Rock (FFCR). This issue committee and its registered agent, Don Mulligan, worked to inform Castle Rock citizens of the upcoming election and the effect of a yes vote on both initiatives.

“This is a big win for gun rights in Colorado,” said Luke Wagner, president of C2AA. “It was yet another testament to the power of citizen involvement in their local political processes.” 

For more information, please visit www.colorado2a.org. For questions or to schedule an interview, please send an email to contact@colorado2a.org.  

CPW asks to keep dogs from chasing wildlife

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is issuing a warning to people whose dogs chase wildlife: Keep them under control and away from deer, elk and other wild animals, or face the possibility of steep fines and the loss of a beloved pet.

Dogs that chase wild animals can cause them extreme stress and injuries from bites, wildlife officials said.

By late winter, many big game animals that are susceptible to dog harassment are pregnant females. As they run to escape, deer and elk expend crucial energy that can lead to an increase in the mortality rate of the animals or their unborn calves and fawns.

To report any instance of dogs chasing wildlife, the public can call the local Colorado Parks and Wildlife office or Colorado State Patrol. In Colorado, the fine for knowingly or negligently allowing a dog to harass wildlife is $274, including surcharges.

Moffat County Birding Club seeking members

Craig resident Patti Mosbey started the Moffat County Birding Club earlier this year where bird enthusiasts can meet to discuss bird species, take photographs of birds and go on birding outings. The bird club offers a great opportunity to meet new people and see new places. Find the group on Facebook under Moffat County birding. For more information, call 970-629-1098.

Driving under effects of marijuana is illegal

As new laws based on Amendment 64 continue to regulate recreational marijuana, the Colorado State Patrol reminds motorists that driving while impaired by marijuana is illegal.

Recent changes, which loosen rules governing the purchase, possession and consumption of marijuana by adults who are 21 and older, do not mitigate the responsibility to drive sober at all times.

All CSP troopers are trained in the detection of impairment from alcohol, drugs and other substances. Also, many troopers have received additional training as certified drug recognition experts. During the course of a traffic contact, any driver suspected of driving while impaired by marijuana may be asked to complete voluntary roadside maneuvers and submit to a chemical test. Refusal of a chemical test results in stricter penalties than compliance.

Troopers actively will seek and arrest impaired drivers. The increased vigilance leading into 2014 underscores the agency’s ongoing commitment to combating impaired driving through intelligence-led enforcement strategies across the state.

State receives $750K for land, water conservation

The state of Colorado received a $750,000 award this month through the Land and Water Conservation Fund grant for establishing and enhancing outdoor recreation opportunities, according to a press release.

“This award ensures we can continue to broaden and strengthen Colorado’s outdoor recreation community,” Bob Broscheid, Colorado Parks and Wildlife director, said in a statement.

The award is disbursed to local governments through an annual grant cycle administered by the Colorado State Trails Program within Parks and Wildlife. Applications are analyzed and scored based upon priorities outlined in Colorado’s Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan.

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