Craig briefs: Empty Bowl fundraiser set for Friday in Craig

Advertisement

St. Michael Community Kitchen is having its first Empty Bowl fundraiser from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday. Tickets cost $15 for adults, $10 for kids 10 and younger and family tickets are $45. Tickets are on sale at K&S Creations, The Kitchen Shop and St. Michael Community Kitchen. Admission includes soup, bread dessert and entertainment. All proceeds will benefit St. Michael’s Community Kitchen. Roughly 400 handmade bowls have been created for the event. A silent action will also take place.

Taste of Education coming in November

The Taste of Education is slated from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 9 at Colorado Northwestern Community College. The event is a free day of workshops, classes and seminars, giving the community an opportunity to get a “real” college experience in one day. Baby-sitting referrals will be available, and the event includes a free lunch. For more information, call 970-824-1101.

CPW warns poachers of foul play during season

The recent poaching arrest of four men from South Carolina by Colorado Parks and Wildlife has prompted public discussion and debate about the importance of ethical hunting, according to a news release. It also illustrates how seriously the agency, law-abiding hunters and many residents of the state take illegal wildlife activity.


After a lengthy investigation by state and federal wildlife officials, George Plummer, Michael Courtney, Joseph Nevling and James Cole were arrested Sept. 7 near Collbran for suspicion of violating a variety of wildlife laws, including using a powerful toxin attached to their arrows, hunting after legal hours, using bow-mounted electronic or battery-powered devices and hunting bear, deer and elk over bait.


“In Colorado, wildlife regulations exist for three main reasons,” Northwest Regional Manager Ron Velarde said in a statement. “There are biological reasons, safety reasons and ‘fair chase’ considerations. The use of poisons or toxicants to hunt is a very unethical method of hunting, violating the tenets of fair chase and can also be very dangerous to the user.”



Velarde added that the use of poisons and toxicants allows an individual to take an irresponsible shot, relying on the effects of the drugs to kill the animal rather than skill, patience, discipline and a well-placed shot.
During the course of the yearlong investigation, the four men were placed under surveillance by investigators from Colorado Parks and Wildlife and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The four men quickly pleaded guilty to the illegal activity. Plummer, who is considered the leader of the group, admitted to officers that he had used poisoned arrows in Colorado for the past 20 years while fully aware that it is illegal in this state.


The four accepted a plea bargain and agreed to pay more than $10,000 in fines for the use of the toxicant and for illegal possession of big game. 



“Poachers are not hunters, they are criminals, plain and simple,” said Parks and Wildlife Deputy Regional Manager Dean Riggs. “They steal wildlife from the citizens of Colorado, take opportunity away from ethical hunters and have a negative impact on wildlife management objectives.”



Riggs adds that poachers should be aware that wildlife investigators are diligent and tenacious in their efforts to bring offenders to justice and use many of the same investigative tools and high-tech forensic methods used by all law enforcement agencies.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.