Katie Grobe: Waiting tests our resolve

— One of the most difficult things for me is waiting — waiting for something to happen, waiting to recover from grief or illness or waiting for someone to follow through.

Waiting tests our resolve, tempers our excitement and clearly delineates our weaknesses.

The Bible is full of those who had to wait — Joseph had to wait in prison for many years, Moses had to wait for 40 years, Hannah waited for a child, Job waited on his God and Noah waited for the waters to come and then for the waters to go.

James 5:11 states, “ As you know, we consider blessed those who have persevered. You have heard of Job's perseverance and have seen what the Lord finally brought about. The Lord is full of compassion and mercy.”

Waiting doesn’t imply that there is nothing to be done. Noah worked while he waited, life continued for Joseph regardless of his surroundings and Moses married and had children.

Some of this waiting was not so beneficial. While Abraham waited for a son, some interesting choices were made with Sarah’s servant, Hagar. Peter, James and John fell asleep while they were supposed to be waiting while Jesus prayed.

God uses waiting to teach us and refine us, but the enemy uses waiting to tempt us and deflate us.

The story of King David and Bathsheba outlines how temptation can push us into sinful and harmful actions. After committing adultery, David couldn’t handle the pressure of waiting for Uriah to return, and so David set into motion a fatal plan.

Our response to waiting determines the outcome — if we learn from it and grow or if we give up and are defeated.

2 Corinthians 4:16-18 states, “Therefore we do not lose heart. Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day. For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen. For what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.”

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