Brooke Tyrrel, left, and Mike Holloway, fourth-graders at East Elementary School, pet a miniature horse named Gem on Thursday during Fourth Grade Ag Day at the Moffat County Fairgrounds. The educational event that celebrates western heritage was sponsored by Moffat County Cattlewomen.

Photo by Joe Moylan

Brooke Tyrrel, left, and Mike Holloway, fourth-graders at East Elementary School, pet a miniature horse named Gem on Thursday during Fourth Grade Ag Day at the Moffat County Fairgrounds. The educational event that celebrates western heritage was sponsored by Moffat County Cattlewomen.

Craig youngsters receive education in Western heritage

Moffat County Cattlewomen host annual Fourth Grade Ag Day

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David Bray discusses all-terrain vehicle safety with children from Heather Trapp's fourth-grade class from Ridgeview Elementary School on Thursday.

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David Bray discusses all-terrain vehicle safety with children from Heather Trapp's fourth-grade class from Ridgeview Elementary School during Thursday's Fourth Grade Ag Day at the Moffat County Fairgrounds.

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Becky Bowland shows children from Linda Davis' fourth-grade class at East Elementary School a variety of horse riding and packing equipment during Fourth Grade Ag Day at the Moffat County Fairgrounds. The annual educational event teaches youngsters about western heritage and farming and ranching culture.

Quotable...

“We started this to teach kids about agriculture, farming and ranching heritage, and Western culture. It’s surprising, even in Craig, how many kids don’t know about the agricultural lifestyle that surrounds them. A lot of kids go to the grocery store and think milk comes from a carton.”

Betty Ann Duzik, president of Moffat County Cattlewomen, about hosting the annual Fourth Grade Ag Day.

— Craig elementary school students received a lesson in Western heritage Thursday during Fourth Grade Ag Day at the Moffat County Fairgrounds.

The educational event, sponsored by Moffat County Cattlewomen, teaches youngsters from Sunset, Ridgeview, Sandrock and East elementary schools about a variety of farm and ranching activities, including livestock health, old fashioned techniques, water, farm safety, agriculture, butchering and branding.

Betty Ann Duzik, president of Moffat County Cattlewomen, has been participating in the annual event for about the last 20 years.

“We started this to teach kids about agriculture, farming and ranching heritage, and Western culture,” Duzik said. “It’s surprising, even in Craig, how many kids don’t know about the agricultural lifestyle that surrounds them. A lot of kids go to the grocery store and think milk comes from a carton.”

The event featured a variety of interactive stations where children were invited to share their family livestock brands and learn about everything from all-terrain vehicle safety to sustainable agricultural practices.

But by far the favorite part of the experience for the children was interacting with horses, cows and miniature horses.

Marissa Lindsey, 9, a student at East Elementary School, lives on a ranch where her parents raise horses and cows.

Even though interacting with livestock is a part of her daily routine, she said she loved getting the chance to meet a pair of miniature horses named Gem and Apache.

“The animals are the best part because they’re part of nature,” she said.

Her classmate, Mike Holloway, 9, agreed.

“The sand thing was cool, but the animals are definitely the best part because they’re cute,” Mike said.

Joe Moylan can be reached at 970-875-1794 or jmoylan@CraigDailyPress.com

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