Candidates Q-and-A: Tony Bohrer

photo

Courtesy

Tony Bohrer

Age: 30

Occupation: Pastor/ Local manager

Years in Craig: 30

Immediate family: Shannon Bohrer

Previous political experience/civic involvement: (Not answered)

Q: The Craig City Council recently passed an ordinance prohibiting the use of marijuana on industrial and commercial zoned properties. Do you support that ordinance? Why or why not? If elected, what other steps would you take in regards to Amendment 64 implementation?

A: I do support this ordinance. I have heard both sides argue their points and still feel the need to support this ordinance. One of the biggest reasons I am against Amendment 64 is because marijuana is a starter drug.

Q: Craig recently took part in a downtown revitalization assessment focused on spurring economic development in the downtown core. What do you consider to be the state of Craig’s economy, and what specific steps would you take as a city councilor to address local economic issues?

A: I think the economy is coming back slowly in some business and real slow in others. I was able to attend two nights of the assessment and feel like it went really good. They had a lot of great ideas and I can’t wait to hear the report in six to eight weeks. I believe it all comes down to vision. The Bible says, “without vision the people perish.” We need a fresh vision and to try to create some excitement for our downtown business. They are a big part of our community.

Q: Do you agree with renewable energy mandates? If so, why? If not, what would you do to change things?

A: No. The City Council doesn’t have much control of the mandates of renewable energy for Moffat County. We need to do our best to communicate and educate people on the mandates. The city needs to do whatever it can to help the commissioners, and the commissioners need to help the city to make it the best place we can.

Q: Rehabilitating the Shadow Mountain subdivision is estimated to cost $4.5 million in city and county funds. Do you support that sort of expenditure, and what do you think is the right long-term approach to Shadow Mountain capital infrastructure needs and oversight?

A: I understand that Shadow Mountain was built to last 10 to 15 years and it has more than doubled that amount of time. It sounds like a lot of money and I feel like we need to do whatever we can to keep the cost as low as we can. Also, to make it as easy for the people who live there as possible. It is going to cost the homeowners a lot more money if something does break. We need to be proactive and not reactive.

Q: Years ago, voters approved the idea of building a recreation center but would not support the $15 million cost for its construction or tax increases to fund the center into the future. Does the City of Craig need a rec center, and if so, would you explore options to reintroduce the project while in office?

A: I am in full support of revisiting the idea of a recreation center. We can look at other ways than increasing taxes to get this project done.

Q: What do you view as the most pressing issues and greatest opportunities facing Craig in the next two to four years, and what are your ideas to address them?

A: Pressing issues: coal, oil and gas. We need again to communicate and educate as many people as we can about these areas. We need coal jobs and we need oil and gas. When you create jobs, you improve the economy, the people and the city.

Craig is full of opportunities. We have a lot of great things going for us. Like everywhere, we have some things we could use a little help on. A little bit of vision casting could go a long ways in our great town. All of us want it to be a better place for the generations to come.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.