Shadow Mountain, pictured here from the east, is long overdue for road and service line improvements. Several citizens said the sidewalks also are in need of work. Craig City Council on Tuesday the invited the Moffat County Commission for a workshop to discuss the latest developments about the joint $4.5 million project.

Photo by Joe Moylan

Shadow Mountain, pictured here from the east, is long overdue for road and service line improvements. Several citizens said the sidewalks also are in need of work. Craig City Council on Tuesday the invited the Moffat County Commission for a workshop to discuss the latest developments about the joint $4.5 million project.

Shadow Mountain residents talk improvement needs

Moffat County Commissioners receive project update from Craig City Council

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Quotable...

“It was never meant to be permanent, but it is. It’s good enough to survive, but it wouldn’t hurt my feelings if they fixed the roads.”

Ruth Craig, Shadow Mountain resident for more than five years, about the need for infrastructure improvements in the subdivision.

Early Tuesday morning Moffat County Commissioners Chuck Grobe and John Kinkaid were sworn into office.

And it didn’t take long for their counterparts at the City of Craig to invite them to a Tuesday night workshop to bring the newly elected county officials up to speed on a variety of projects, including Shadow Mountain.

Improvements to the subdivision’s roads, curbs and gutters, and main water and sewer lines have been an on again-off again topic of conversation for at least the last eight years, former Commissioner Tom Gray said last month.

Though the subdivision’s 625 residents have yet to see a resolution for their pot hole ridden streets and aging service lines, many are excited about the possibility of improvements beginning as early as this summer.

“It was never meant to be permanent, but it is,” said Ruth Craig, who has lived in Shadow Mountain for the last five years. “It’s good enough to survive, but it wouldn’t hurt my feelings if they fixed the roads.”

Though many people are aware of the subdivision’s aging sewer and water lines, most residents talked about the immediate need for new roads and sidewalks.

Wyatt and Dylan Villa, Shadow Mountain residents for more than 10 years, said though they’re careful about what cars they drive around the neighborhood — the brothers spent their Tuesday afternoon working on a 1972 International Scout that replaces their more compact summertime vehicles — they both referenced an infamous stretch of sidewalk that is nearly impassible because it buckled on itself creating a two-foot tall peak.

Betty Jo Anderson corroborated the Villa’s observation, saying the stretch of sidewalk in question has been warped for the entire 18 years she’s been a Shadow Mountain resident.

“In terms of maintenance we receive all of the same services as everybody else, so the plowing and things like that are fine,” she said. “When it comes time (for repairs) they’re going to spend a lot of time on potholes, but the sidewalks are by far the worst.”

Though Shadow Mountain improvements have been on the minds of elected officials for almost a decade a plan to address the subdivision’s lingering issues only picked up steam last year when the county earmarked $2.5 million from the road and bridge fund in the 2012 budget for it’s share of the estimated $4.5 million project.

The city has committed $1 million from its water and sewer enterprise fund, leaving the city and the county about $1 million short.

But last month Craig City Manager Jim Ferree and Moffat County Developmental Services Director Roy Tipton submitted an application for a $1 million energy impact grant through Colorado Department of Local Affairs.

Though the city and the county applied for the grant jointly — and began engineering work at Shadow Mountain in April to ensure the project would be “shovel ready” if approved — competition for energy impact funds is expected to be fierce with just an estimated $17 million available in the statewide pot.

DOLA is expected to announce energy impact grant recipients in April, Ferree said.

Joe Moylan can be reached at 875-1794 or jmoylan@craigdailypress.com

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