Jade Stees, left, and her mom, Margaret Stees, take a guess at the cost of a cart full of groceries Sunday at City Market in Craig. The Moffat County Farm Bureau and Moffat County Cattlewomen hosted Food Check-Out Day to remind shoppers that their food comes from farmers and ranchers and not just the grocery store.

Photo by Darian Warden

Jade Stees, left, and her mom, Margaret Stees, take a guess at the cost of a cart full of groceries Sunday at City Market in Craig. The Moffat County Farm Bureau and Moffat County Cattlewomen hosted Food Check-Out Day to remind shoppers that their food comes from farmers and ranchers and not just the grocery store.

Craig grocery shoppers get a reminder about the source of their food

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— City Market shoppers in downtown Craig were reminded where the food in their shopping carts came from Sunday thanks to representatives of the Moffat County Farm Bureau and Moffat County Cattlewomen.

“We’re here to make people aware that food comes from the farmers and ranchers and not just the grocery store,” said Dona Shue, who sits on the Moffat County Farm Bureau’s board of directors. “There are people who don’t really know anymore where their food comes from.”

Shue, her husband, Bill, and Shirley Lawton also had a poster displaying animal byproducts for shoppers to look at.

“Sometimes people don’t think about what comes from the animal besides the food,” Shue said. “Medicine, crayons, all kinds of things. Without the animals we’d be losing all this other stuff, too.”

Because of Moffat County’s agricultural roots, Lawton said many residents are more aware of where their food comes from thanks folks in other areas.

“We all live close to the land and people are able to see the farmers and ranchers in their fields and the cattle and sheep,” Lawton said.

The trio also presented shoppers with a breakdown of every dollar spent on food.

For example, of every dollar spent, 20 cents goes to the farmer and the remaining 80 cents goes to the grocery store or restaurant. Of the portion that goes to the store or restaurant, 39 cents goes to workers handling the products, 9 cents goes to packaging, 4 cents goes to transportation, 3 cents goes to utilities, 4 cents are profit, 4 cents go to advertising, 5 cents goes toward depreciation, 4 cents goes to facility rent and 8 cents goes to interest on loans, business taxes and other miscellaneous expenses.

Shoppers stopped by the table to check out the information and take a guess at the total cost of a cart full of groceries on display. The person with the closest guess without going over at the end of the day won the groceries.

“We’re trying to make people aware, and giving away free groceries is a good way of catching people,” Lawton said.

Darian Warden can be reached at 875-1793 or dwarden@craigdailypress.com

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