Peyton Voloshin shows her market lamb, Duke, at the Moffat County Fair on Wednesday evening in the livestock barn at the Moffat County Fairgrounds. Peyton won first place for showmanship in the intermediate division.

Photo by Nate Waggenspack

Peyton Voloshin shows her market lamb, Duke, at the Moffat County Fair on Wednesday evening in the livestock barn at the Moffat County Fairgrounds. Peyton won first place for showmanship in the intermediate division.

Shear happiness rings through Moffat County Fair as children show off lambs

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The winner of the advanced showman division shakes hands with the judge at the market lamb show Wednesday at the Moffat County Fairgrounds.

— Children put their prized lambs on display at the Moffat County Fair on Wednesday evening for the popular market lamb show.

Junior, intermediate and senior showmen from the county paraded their animals around the livestock barn at the Moffat County Fairgrounds. They were tested on their ability to show off their lambs, and then the lambs themselves were judged on their value as a product to be sold.

In the showmanship portion of the competition, handlers were judged on how well they could show their lamb to the judge. That meant getting them in the proper position and keeping them there, said JD Sexton, Moffat County Extension director.

“They want to be making sure the tops are level, legs are square and they are elevated through the front,” Sexton said about what the judge is looking for in showmanship.

In the intermediate competition, Peyton Voloshin was awarded first place for showmanship after she improved her ability to show her lamb, Duke, the second time around.

Contestants were given advice about how to better show their lambs and evaluated based on their ability to respond to that direction. Voloshin was singled out for being able to follow her instructions.

“He told me I was keeping my arm around his neck while I was leading him, and you want it to be just under the chin,” she said.

Peyton struggled to get Duke to cooperate with her for much of the competition, but when she put him in position, it was good enough to win.

“Showmanship is how well the kids can show their animal,” Sexton said. “It’s all about the kid and what they can do.”

Peyton said it took a couple of hours to shear and prepare Duke for competition, but winning made it worth the effort.

Nate Waggenspack can be reached at 970-875-1795 or nwaggenspack@CraigDailyPress.com

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