This grouping of antlers is the beginning of an archway being built in the trophy room at Wyman Museum. The museum is requesting a set of Clyde the elk's antlers be returned to help complete the arch.

Photo by Nate Waggenspack

This grouping of antlers is the beginning of an archway being built in the trophy room at Wyman Museum. The museum is requesting a set of Clyde the elk's antlers be returned to help complete the arch.

Wyman Museum seeks return of Clyde's antlers to complete remodel

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Lou Wyman stands with an elk in the trophy room at Wyman Museum. The upstairs room at the museum is undergoing a remodel, and Wyman is hoping to have a pair of antlers from Clyde the elk returned to aid in its completion.

— Wyman Museum employees are hoping to have a key piece of the museum’s history returned to help complete the design of the remodeled trophy room.

The museum is creating an archway of elk antlers, but to complete it, Wyman employee Nicky Boulger is asking for the return a set of antlers that was stolen at the end of February.

The antlers belonged to the museum’s longtime mascot, Clyde the elk, who died during the winter. Several of his racks adorn the archway-in-progress, but the missing set of antlers was his largest, Boulger said.

“If anybody has information on Clyde’s antlers, we would appreciate it,” Boulger said. “If whoever took them brought them back here, we wouldn’t ask any questions. We would just be happy to have them. I might even take them to lunch.”

The antlers were on display at the Moffat County Tourism Association when they disappeared. Boulger said no one is sure what happened because the antlers would not be easy to walk away with unnoticed.

Lou Wyman, the museum’s owner, called the disappearance of the antlers “a bummer” and said he wished the recovery attempt had received more attention immediately after they disappeared.

In addition to the requests for Clyde’s antlers, Boulger said the museum is seeking antler donations to help complete the archway as well as a bobcat or coyote to help round out the animals on display.

Nate Waggenspack can be reached at 875-1795 or nwaggenspack@craigdailypress.com.

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