Lance Scranton: Making a difference

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Lance Scranton

Many of us find ourselves in volunteer situations because of the activities in which our children choose to be involved.

A number of fathers and other interested men find time each week during the fall to help coach and referee in the Doak Walker Football League.

I marvel at the patience and calm demeanor that most of the volunteer coaches display. They consistently yell encouragement from the sidelines and show young children how to appreciate competition and love the game of football.

The officials take time to make sure that safety is observed and that all the players get to know how to formation correctly and get set before a play is activated from the line of scrimmage.

It’s amazing to watch all the little bodies flying around out on the field and how each team works in concert to make plays work on offense and not allow plays to be successful when on defense. All this made possible by parents and adults who pour their time into the lives of young boys.

It’s easy to look around our community and be frustrated because of the many things we think we should have but difficult to put aside our criticisms and make the volunteer effort. The lessons we learn from our efforts to make things better are sometimes overshadowed because our best intentions are frustrated.

The most valuable lesson I have ever learned about volunteerism is that the act is sometimes the most difficult part.

When we are hired for a job, we get paid, so we hope that people who hire us want us to be there. But when we volunteer, we can sometimes feel as though we aren’t really needed and there are others who would be better than us.

Volunteering is much like experiencing something new, different, or confusing. We are uncertain about how to go forward for fear that we will make a mistake, be misunderstood, or look foolish.

However, when we take the first step and jump into the deep waters of volunteering, we find that there is plenty of space for us to spread our arms and legs, get our head above water and realize that our efforts are matched by the needs we meet.

Simply put, the more we volunteer, the more we are needed and the greater our service is valued. We aren’t always treated the way we deserve or appreciated the way we would like but maybe that simply reveals our true reasons for volunteering in the first place.

If we’re volunteering to shine a light on ourselves, instead of those we are helping, then we’re in it for the wrong reasons

For every person who volunteers to make Craig a better place to live, please know that without your selfless service our “community” is not possible.

Your efforts to make our children’s lives fuller and richer are definitely appreciated!

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