A Euclid 302LD Dump Truck arrives Tuesday at the Wyman Museum. The truck will be put on display just south of the museum.

Photo by Joe Moylan

A Euclid 302LD Dump Truck arrives Tuesday at the Wyman Museum. The truck will be put on display just south of the museum.

Staying in the community

Wyman Museum receives Euclid dump truck from Trapper Mine

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Lou Wyman, center, flanked from right by Guy Sanborn, Wayne Goodnow, Lonnie Parrish, Tony Peroulis, Jim Herschberg and Tyler Ripka, welcomes Tuesday the arrival of a Euclid 302LD Dump Truck at the Wyman Museum. The Euclid was donated by Trapper Mine.

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A Euclid 302LD Dump Truck rolls into the Wyman Museum. Tony Peroulis, of Peroulis Brothers, hauled the truck to Wyman Museum free of charge.

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A Euclid 302LD Dump Truck prepares to be unloaded Tuesday at the Wyman Museum. Known as Truck 711, the Euclid was one of 11 operated during the early years of Trapper Mine.

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A Euclid 302LD Dump Truck is unloaded Tuesday near its new home on the south side of the Wyman Museum. The truck, recently retired and donated to the museum by Trapper Mine, hauled more than 1,344,000 tons of coal and ash during its 20 years of service at Trapper Mine.

Euclid 302LD Dump Truck specifications…

Truck:

• Payload — 50 tons

• Empty weight — 78,625 pounds

• Loaded weight — 178,625 pounds

• Length — 30 feet, 4 inches

• Width — 13 feet, 3 inches

• Height — 13 feet, 1 inch

Engine:

• Cummins, 4-cycle diesel, Model VT-1710-C

• 635 horsepower

• V12 engine with 1,710 cubic inch displacement

Transmission:

• Allison CLBT-6061 automatic

• 6 forward speeds, 1 reverse speed

• Integral retarder

Tires:

• 24.00x35, 32 ply rating in the front and rear

Quotable...

“We wanted it because it’s extra big, different from anything we have here and it’s something that’s a part of the community. You know, with this being coal country.”

Lou Wyman about Trapper Mine’s donation of a Euclid 302LD Dump Truck to the Wyman Museum.

Wyman Museum on Tuesday welcomed the latest addition to its collection of historical artifacts, a Euclid 302LD Dump Truck.

The Euclid, known as Truck 711, was donated by Trapper Mine where it was used to haul coal and ash, to and from neighboring Craig Station from May 1979 until July 2009.

During that time Truck 711 accumulated 54,785 operating hours and hauled more than 1,344,000 tons of coal and ash.

With a payload of 50 tons, Truck 711 made more than 26,880 trips during its 20 years of service at Trapper Mine.

“We wanted it because it’s extra big, different from anything we have here and it’s something that’s a part of the community,” said Lou Wyman. “You know, with this being coal country.”

Tony Peroulis, of Peroulis Brothers, hauled the Euclid from Trapper Mine to Wyman Museum free of charge.

Now that it has arrived at its new home Wyman said Truck 711 will be put on display just south of the museum.

Visitors will be welcome to walk around the massive machine, but Wyman doesn’t know yet if they will allow people to climb up to inspect the cab.

Truck 711 was one of 11 Euclid trucks operated during the early years of Trapper Mine.

At more than 30 feet long, 13 feet wide and 13 feet high, Truck 711 was powered by a 635-horsepower, Cummins 4-cycle diesel engine with a 1,710-cubic inch V12 engine.

Truck 711 featured a six-speed automatic transmission and rolled on 24.00x35 tires.

“This was the biggest truck they made when Trapper Mine bought it,” Wyman said. “Now they’re twice as big.”

Euclid was founded during the 1920’s in Ohio.

In addition to being known for building large, earth-moving machines Euclid trucks were easily recognizable for their “Euclid green” color.

Over the years Euclid has been bought and sold by numerous companies, including General Motors, White Motor Corporation, Daimler Benz, Clark Equipment Company and Volvo Construction Equipment.

Euclid is currently owned by Hitachi Construction Machinery Company in Japan.

Joe Moylan can be reached at 875-1794 or jmoylan@craigdailypress.com.

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