Patrick Germond: The miracles of being grateful

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Courtesy Photo

Patrick Germond

Remember being told as a child to be grateful?

Your parents would say things like, “Be grateful for your food, there are people in other countries who don’t have anything to eat.”

I had a problem being grateful as a child because I had everything handed to me by my parents and I bore no responsibilities.

As an adult, I’ve had to take responsibility for the lives of other people, and in doing so I’ve learned a bit more about being grateful.

I’m sure as adults each of us are grateful for a lot of different things, such as our families or friends, our children returning from school or other activities unharmed, getting a good bill of health from the doctor, or even having a job or food in these tough economic times.

Beyond the basics, there are some other unique rewards involved in being grateful for individuals and blessings in our lives, rewards that come from gratefulness itself.

These rewards can help us leave behind pain and sorrow, and enrich the lives of other people.

While sitting in church one particular Sunday, the speaker was talking about anger and how to purge it from our lives.

The speaker spoke about how being hateful and mad at someone was like drinking poison and expecting your enemy to get sick.

He quoted a scripture to the effect that God will forgive who he will, but of us it is required to forgive all.

What really caught my attention was he was giving instructions to the congregation on how to forgive someone who has inflicted serious wrong on us, and that we as individuals may even have good and justifiable reasons to hate that person.

This concept didn’t seem logical to me because some families have had serious crimes committed against them.

Are they supposed to forgive their offender? The short answer: yes, they are.

Forgiveness and trust are two separate things. You should forgive the offender, but you do not necessarily have to trust them. If victims are to have closure and move on with their lives, forgiveness is a major step in the healing process.

The remedy for getting over anger is to be grateful for the gifts and blessings you have been given, and to learn from adversity in your life. I decided to take the speaker’s advice and gave being more thankful a try.

I was extremely impressed how well that it actually works.

The power of gratitude has a positive affect on other people when we show them we are grateful for their presence in our lives.

Our community has had its’ fair share of suicides and the sadness that accompanies them.

One of the final thoughts a person must have when contemplating suicide is he or she believes the world would be better off without them.

Many people feel isolated and alone because there are not enough people in their lives expressing to them how grateful they are to have them as a family member or friend.

It’s hard for a person to really care about themselves when they feel no one else cares about them. Life can be a sad, cold place if you don’t have someone on your side pulling for you.

I like to show gratitude to the people in my life by telling them how special they are to me and that I enjoy having them around. I encourage role models to share with younger people how important and bright you see them in their future.

Give them honorable and courageous shoes to fill by way of your positive expectations. They’ll do it and thank you later for believing in them.

Gratefulness is often overlooked, but if a person finds and appreciates the divine power it holds, they can work miracles here on Earth.

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