Moffat County High School students Owen Nichols (left) and Michael Samuelson participate in the “reverse lunge” to help stretch and warm up for the BEAST training session Thursday. BEAST is being taught by MCHS graduate and Colorado Mesa University strength and conditioning coach Daniel Linsacum with the aim of education athletes about proper strength training.

Photo by Nate Waggenspack

Moffat County High School students Owen Nichols (left) and Michael Samuelson participate in the “reverse lunge” to help stretch and warm up for the BEAST training session Thursday. BEAST is being taught by MCHS graduate and Colorado Mesa University strength and conditioning coach Daniel Linsacum with the aim of education athletes about proper strength training.

Moffat County Booster Club brings college strength coach to teach class

Keys to training ...

Colorado Mesa University strength and conditioning coach Daniel Linsacum’s keys to training safely and effectively

  1. Progression: Make sure you build up to the larger weights, both during a workout and over time. Don’t put up the big weights right away. Your body just needs to be pushed a bit, and then heal so you can push it again.
  2. Technique: Utilizing the proper technique while lifting is going to give a better workout than using more weight.
  3. Pushups: Bench press gets all the glory, but pushups and other body weight exercises (pull-ups, lunges, etc.) are a great way to get just as effective a workout, and they often get more muscles involved.
  4. Range of Motion: Making sure to have proper range of motion will help prevent injuries, promote better technique and a more effective workout.

Quotable

“I remember being younger and lifting on my own without a lot of leadership. Hopefully we can teach (the students) the proper ways to weight-lift and they aren’t trying to learn from a magazine on their own quite as much.”

— Daniel Linsacum, Colorado Mesa University strength and conditioning coach and MCHS graduate, about the importance of teaching proper weightlifting technique

In high school sports, being stronger and faster than your opponents becomes more important.

Whereas in elementary and middle school sports the victors are often the athletes that are the biggest, most mature or most skilled due to practice, at the high school level strength and conditioning training become vital aspects of preparation as well.

Having a stellar set of post moves won’t help a forward in high school basketball if he can’t contend with his opponents down low. Even if an athlete can spike a ball harder than anyone else, it won’t matter if she’s worn down by the fourth set and losing power.

That’s why the Moffat County Booster Club had Colorado Mesa University strength and conditioning coach Daniel Linsacum, an MCHS graduate, come to Moffat County High School Thursday and Friday give middle and high school students a run through his BEAST training session.

“It’s a valuable tool for our students, youth through high school,” Moffat County School District athletic director Jeff Simon said. “The more we can do things to help our community, the better.”

Linsacum was a football player and wrestler at MCHS, graduating in 1997. He said he wanted to come back and teach the class because weightlifting is something that can be dangerous if not done properly.

“I remember being younger and lifting on my own without a lot of leadership,” Linsacum said. “Hopefully we can teach them the proper ways to weight-lift and they aren’t trying to learn from a magazine on their own quite as much.

“It’s also that strength conditioning has changed completely over the past decade. It used to be strength conditioning as more of a body-building exercise, now it’s about functional strength that will cross over to the playing field.”

The two-day strength program (Thursday and today) will focus on lifting and stability, Linsacum said. He wanted to make sure participants developed a good base for warming up as well as weightlifting.

Owen Nichols, 16, is an incoming junior at MCHS and a wrestler for the school. He was attending BEAST to build a foundation and be more ready for the wrestling season.

“I need to condition for wrestling and learn how to improve strength so I can do better on the mat,” Nichols said.

Linsacum said he is hoping to return for more advanced sessions of BEAST in late July.

“If they want to go to college and be involved with sports, this is the kind of stuff they’ll see,” he said. If they can start working on it now, they’ll have a better base when they get to college”

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