News for Monday, February 27, 2012

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Jean White-sponsored bill proposes keeping federal mineral lease money in communities

Senate Bill 31 unanimously passed the Senate on Monday. White said it would help cash-strapped communities.

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TMH rehab relocation postponed

Plans to relocate The Memorial Hospital’s Rehabilitation Center to TMH Medical Clinic are on hold for now. “We’ll put together a plan and go back to the board,” said Jennifer Riley, TMH chief of organizational excellence. The hospital’s initial plan was to move the rehabilitation center from its current location in Suite 116 in Centennial Mall to the east end of the clinic in April. The move would have placed rehabilitation closer to physicians in the clinic, thereby making it a more convenient location for patients, Chief Financial Officer Bryan Chalmers said during an interview in early February.

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Becca Pugh overcame fears to win a seat on MCHS Student Council

Becca Pugh is nothing like the student body president portrayed in most teen movies. She wasn’t the popular girl in school, at least not initially. The 18-year-old Moffat County High School senior is quiet by nature, and learning to speak publicly was sometimes a painful process, she said. In short, Becca’s ascent to the student council presidency wasn’t a product of effortless charm or graced social status. She earned it through hard work and by extending herself far beyond her self-perceived limitations.

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At the Movies: ‘One for the Money’ is bankrupt of humor

If you’re planning to view “One for the Money,” but you’re not sure what to expect, the old expression from which it gets its title provides the best advice. As long as you skip over the whole “two for the show, three to get ready” part and jump ahead to “four to go,” by which I mean leave the theater as quick as you can. Unemployment hasn’t been kind to Stephanie Plum (Katherine Heigl). Months of trying to find a new career after being laid off from the lingerie department of Macy’s have only brought repossession of her car and an eviction notice at her apartment. Applying for a position with her bail bondsman cousin (Patrick Fischler) doesn’t grant her the filing job she’d hoped for, but the idea of being a bounty hunter intrigues her. Even better is the prospect of tracking down her high school boyfriend (Jason O’Mara), a cop who’s been on the run from the courts in disgrace after a drug bust gone bad. Taking home $50,000 for nabbing the guy who dumped her as teenager is all the inspiration Stephanie needs to take up the new line of work, training with an experienced “bail enforcement agent” (Daniel Sunjata).

On the Record for Feb. 27, 2012

On the Record for Feb. 27, 2012

'The Artist' earns best-picture, lead-actor Oscars

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Academy Awards voters have spoken up for "The Artist," the first silent film to triumph at Hollywood's highest honors since the original Oscar ceremony 83 years ago. The black-and-white comic melodrama took four prizes Sunday, including best picture, actor for Jean Dujardin and director for Michel Hazanavicius. Not since the World War I saga "Wings" was named outstanding picture at the first Oscars in 1929 had a silent film earned the top prize. The other top Oscars went to Meryl Streep as best actress for "The Iron Lady," Octavia Spencer as supporting actress for "The Help" and Christopher Plummer as supporting actor for "Beginners."

Boxer suspended 1 year for doping-rules violation

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has suspended a boxer who it says failed three times to meet requirements for his whereabouts so he could be found for out-of-competition drug testing. The agency said Sunday that an independent arbitrator found 23-year-old Lenroy Thompson, of Lenexa, Kan., violated whereabouts requirements three times in 18 months. He has been suspended from the sport for one year. All of his competitive results will be disqualified dating back to Nov. 9, the date of his third whereabouts failure.

Patrick Germond: Help with the hams

“No worries, mate, no worries. Give your Sheila a kiss for me. Sydney, Australia clear.” “Copy that, Sydney. Take care and I’ll talk to you later. This is Kilo Delta Zero Juliet Alfa India out, and the frequency is clear.” What you just read was part of a short wave (ham radio) conversation I had with a fellow from down under last October.

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Local accountant named 2012 Businessperson of the Year

Tracking down the 2012 Businessperson of the Year on a Saturday afternoon in Craig isn’t difficult, but you have to know where to look. This year’s winner is a passionate college hockey fan and also dedicated to his family. It would be a safe expectation to find him at home combing the networks for a rare afternoon telecast of his beloved Colorado College Tigers or spending quality time with his wife, Amy, and their two children, Emma, 8, and Hudson, 6. But less than 24 hours after being honored by the Craig Chamber of Commerce at Friday night’s annual State of the County dinner, Chris Jones was at 458 Yampa Ave., with his brother, Don, working.

Five minutes with Rick Dickson, 56, surface coal mine inspector for U.S Department of Labor’s Mine Safety and Health Administration

Hometown? “I’m from Arvada, which is a suburb of Denver.” When did you come to Craig? “1977. I came here for a job with Colowyo.” Motto or outlook on life? “If I can do one thing to make somebody’s job or life easier, I’ll do it because I know that’s going to come back to me. It took me a long time to learn, but getting ahead isn’t as important as letting it come to you.” How long has your office been in its current location? “It’s maybe just a hair over a year old. Our old one burned down when the Country Mall burned down. We were working on the east side of town when they got the new one built.”

New affiliation boosts musical group’s profile

Making your voice heard is easy when you can articulate yourself through music. But, publicity sometimes takes outside help. Since joining the Craig Chamber of Commerce, members of the Bella Vocé chorus have enjoyed a newfound backing in endorsing their group. “We joined back in January because we wanted to get a lot of the benefits they give to their members,” Bella Vocé team leader Aaron Gillett said. “The Chamber has been really great in helping us create awareness of our group and what we do by promoting us on their site and doing everything else they do for members.” Chamber membership couldn’t have come at a better time for the all-female singing ensemble, which is striving to raise money for trips later this year.

Briefs for February 27: Hospice training today

The Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association is looking for volunteers to help with its hospice program. Volunteer training will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. today and Tuesday and from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Rollingstone Respite House, 1500 Pine Grove Road, in Steamboat Springs. Participants must complete an application before registering for the training. Applications are available at the VNA’s Craig office, 745 Russell St., or its Steamboat Springs office, 940 Central Park Dr., Suite 101. For more information or to register, call Shannon Winegarner at 871-7626.

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Elkhorn Outfitters named 2012 Small Business of the Year

In November 2011, Parker resident Chris Peltz was in Moffat County hunting elk. The 37-year-old stalked herds for six day but had little success bagging one of the animals. Then, on Thanksgiving morning, his last day of the trip, Peltz harvested a spiked bull. For Peltz it was the hunt of a lifetime because he can’t see.

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TMH recognized as Craig Chamber’s Large Business of the Year

Service. Volunteerism. Commitment. These attributes make The Memorial Hospital in Craig stand out in the Craig business community, Craig City Councilor Don Jones said during Friday night’s State of the County event.

LSRV girls win regionals, set sights on state

Jodi Stanley said the Little Snake River Valley (Wyo.) School girls varsity basketball team wanted to come out strong Saturday in the finals of the 1A West Regional Tournament. The Rattlers wasted no time, jumping out to a 25-6 lead after the first quarter and cruising to a 70-46 victory over Cokeville. “We forced a lot of turnovers in the first four minutes of play and we capitalized on them and set the tone for the rest of the game,” said Stanley, the Rattlers head coach. “I think we made them a little nervous early, but they played us even for the next three quarters. We just came out strong early.” Senior Morgan Wille started the Rattlers off with two steals, which turned into four quick points to give LSRV a 4-0 lead.

LSRV boys win elusive regional championship

Paul Prestrud said when a shooter is on, there is no stopping them. Such was the case for Daniel Wille, a Little Snake River Valley (Wyo.) School senior, on Saturday in the finals of the 1A West Regional Tournament. The Burlington defense collapsed inside the paint, forcing the LSRV boys varsity basketball team to take shots from the outside. Wille responded, scoring 36 points, including six 3-pointers, to lead the Rattlers to a 63-53 victory and the senior class’s first regional championship.

Report: Number of Colorado farms up in 2011

The total number of farms and ranches in Colorado increased last year, according to a news release from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Farms and ranches in Colorado in 2011 totaled 36,700, up 300 from 2010, according to National Agricultural Statistics Services numbers cited in the USDA release. Total farmland in Colorado in 2011 was unchanged from 2010, while the average size of a farm in Colorado decreased from 860 acres in 2010 to 853 acres in 2011, according to the release. Nationally, the total number of farms and ranches in 2011 was estimated at 2.2 million, down slightly from 2010, according to the release.

Senior Spotlight for Feb. 27, 2012: Hold on to your hats, umbrellas, etc.

Hold on to your hats, umbrellas, etc. March is just around the corner. March winds are getting an early start. That means it’s time to fly kites. My brother, Charlie, and I would make our own kites from the Denver Post cut out in different shapes. There would be sticks crossed together, rags for a tail and a ball of string to tie it all together. We had to find the right kind of sticks. Most of the time we found broken kites and used what we could off of them.