Bubba Ivers, left, a Moffat County High School junior, checks out a book at the high school library recently with help from James Neton, MCHS librarian and Moffat County School District library coordinator. The high school is participating in World Book Night, a program that gives teachers free books they can hand out to students.

Photo by Bridget Manley

Bubba Ivers, left, a Moffat County High School junior, checks out a book at the high school library recently with help from James Neton, MCHS librarian and Moffat County School District library coordinator. The high school is participating in World Book Night, a program that gives teachers free books they can hand out to students.

MCHS joins with national initiative to get books into students’ hands

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“Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team and a Dream” by H.G. Bissinger is one of eight titles Moffat County High School teachers will give away to students April 23 for World Book Night. The national initiative started in the United Kingdom and is designed to foster literacy in reluctant readers.

At a glance ...

• Moffat County High School teachers will give out 180 free books to students Monday for World Book Night.

• The national event is designed to foster literacy in young adults who wouldn’t otherwise be motivated to read.

• MCHS teachers selected eight titles ranging in genre from fiction to memoir.

• Books were provided to the high school for free.


World Book Night at MCHS:

Moffat County High School teachers chose the following titles to give to students Monday for World Book Night:

• “The Glass Castle: A Memoir” by Jeannette Walls

• “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins

• “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot

• “The Kite Runner” by Khaled Hosseini

• “Q is for Quarry” by Sue Grafton

• “The Stand” by Stephen King

• “The Book Thief” by Markus Zusak

• “Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team and a Dream” by H.G. Bissinger

Quotable

“It’s a way to advertise literacy (and) get kids motivated to read.” — James Neton, Moffat County High School librarian and Moffat County School District library coordinator, about World Book Night.

Heather Fross, a Moffat County High School science teacher, refers often to a source some consider an unusual one for biology class.

It’s called “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” a piece of investigative journalism authored by Rebecca Skloot.

It retraces the history of the book’s title character, an African-American tobacco farmer whose cells were taken without her knowledge and became a powerful tool in modern science.

The book touches on cell biology, genetics and science ethics — all topics Fross covers in her classes — but it also addresses more universal issues.

“Besides the science involved, this book is about race, class, ethics, humanity and family,” Fross wrote in an email.

“These are subjects that we can all relate to.”

On Monday, Fross will have 20 copies of the book to give away to students, compliments of World Book Night.

The national initiative’s goal is to put books in the hands of young adults who may not otherwise read on their own.

Fross and eight other MCHS teachers will hand out 180 books that cover a broad spectrum of genres from fiction to memoir.

World Book Night is new, both to MCHS and the U.S.

The program launched in the U.K. in 2011 and debuted stateside in 2012, according to the organization’s website.

Schools don’t have to worry about the program adding extra costs to library budgets.

“We don’t pay a dime” for the books, said James Neton, MCHS librarian and Moffat County School District library coordinator.

Teachers apply for the initiative and select three titles from a list of books.

If they are accepted, they get 20 copies of one of their top three picks.

The program is designed to “give books away to kids that may not necessarily … read books on their own initiative,” Neton said.

“It’s a way to advertise literacy (and) get kids motivated to read,” he said.

Fross looks forward to seeing what “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” sparks in the minds of her students.

“It opens the door to further discussion beyond what we learn in class,” she said.

MCHS Counselor Carroll Moore also opted to participate in the initiative.

Her book of choice: Stephen King’s “The Stand.”

She first read the book in her mid-20s, and the “survival aspect” it portrayed intrigued her, she said.

“These people went through … all these horrible things and kept going,” she said.

It also acts as a book within a book, offering a multitude of stories within its pages, she said.

Moore has one expectation for students who decide to pick up a copy from her.

“I just hope they enjoy it,” she said.

“That’s what books should be. People should enjoy them.”

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