From left, Moffat County High School students Kyla Warne, Kaitlen Bird and Jordyn Caddy practice in Heather Dahlberg’s choir class Tuesday afternoon at the high school. CenterStage, the MCHS varsity choir, is vying for up to $50,000 in the GLEE Give A Note contest, which is partially vote driven and provides grants to music programs in need across the country.

Photo by Bridget Manley

From left, Moffat County High School students Kyla Warne, Kaitlen Bird and Jordyn Caddy practice in Heather Dahlberg’s choir class Tuesday afternoon at the high school. CenterStage, the MCHS varsity choir, is vying for up to $50,000 in the GLEE Give A Note contest, which is partially vote driven and provides grants to music programs in need across the country.

MCHS choir seeking support in national contest

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To Vote

At a glance …

• CenterStage, Moffat County High School’s varsity choir, is competing in the GLEE Give a Note contest.

• Competition will award a total of $1 million to music programs across the country.

• Community members vote online for competing music programs and can vote more than once.

• Voting ends Nov. 7.

• To vote, visit www.gleegiveanote...

Sequined uniform tops: $85 each.

Sheet music: $2 to $3 apiece.

The costs of maintaining Moffat County High School’s varsity choir quickly add up, said Heather Dahlberg, MCHS theater and choir teacher.

“It’s really funny, even being frugal, how fast the money goes,” she added.

That choir, formally known as CenterStage, is looking for funding from a different source. It’s a competitor in the GLEE Give a Note contest, which will give away a total of $1 million to struggling music programs across the country, according to the contest’s website.

Dahlberg and her choir students are seeking the community’s help to win.

“I think this can show how much our community supports our choir and it just kind of lets people know that we need help in our department,” said Kat Thompson, a CenterStage performer and MCHS senior.

The contest invites music programs to create and submit a short video, which is posted on the contest’s website. There, members of the public can view the videos and cast votes for music programs in their area.

Community members can vote as often as once a day, Dahlberg said.

The competition divides the country into districts, meaning MCHS is competing against schools in Texas, New Mexico, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma, Dahlberg said, which are “pretty big states and really strong music states.”

Top vote getters in each district advance to the next stage of the competition, in which a panel of judges evaluates each finalist based on the originality of their videos, its financial need and other factors.

Grand prize winners get $50,000, and first- and second-place finishers win $25,000 and $10,000, respectively.

If any of those awards go to CenterStage, Dahlberg said, part of the winnings could help pay for anything from new sheet music to trips to see top-notch performances, as well as supporting the choir department as a whole.

Seeing professional performers is of special interest to CenterStage performer Jordyn Caddy, 17, an MCHS senior. She hopes to major in musical theater and eventually make a career out of performing.

“When you go somewhere and you can actually see people doing it for a living … it gives you hope, I guess,” she said.

Voting closes Nov. 7. For more information or to vote, visit www.gleegiveanote.com.

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