The Moffat County DECA team displays their increased membership.

Trenna Kaiser, Blue Print

The Moffat County DECA team displays their increased membership.

DECA/FBLA working through budget cuts

To deal with budget cuts, competitions have been dropped

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Budget cuts are effecting DECA/FBLA members very harshly. While their membership has nearly tripled, their budget has been cut recently. They have had to drop many competitions because they can't afford to attend. According to Krista Schenck adviser to both groups, students are also doing three times the amount of fundraising this year to keep up with the lack of funding.

The clubs were previously in charge of the school store but have lost it due to state laws not allowing food to be sold during school lunches. To deal with this, they have now taken over the concessions at sports activities. "We still have a lot of money to make up, but we are doing alright," president Kirstie McPherson says.

"I have been here seven years, and this is the first year we have not had a school store. I went to school starting in 1990, and we also had a school store back then," Schenk said. In the school store, students can buy school supplies and MCHS Bulldog apparel. Now, if a student wants to buy a sweatshirt or t-shirt they have to contact Schenck.

With money being such a big issue, because members travel extensively to take place in competitions were DECA members take a one hundred question test. Members then have to perform role-plays, where they have to act out a real world situation. They are then judged on the content of their role-play.

To get ready for a competition, DECA/FBLA students review the list of events, and then look at their strengths, weaknesses, and interests. Professionals of business, marketing and technology then judge them on how well they know business and marketing terms and how well they can relate what they know to a real world situation.

"I went to college for marketing and business, so it has always been a passion of mine. Now I get the opportunity to share that with the students," says Schenck. FBLA members have a variety of events to choose from. Some are speaking events, and some are a test. Other events are computer based or written.

Distributive Education Clubs of America's (DECA) purpose is to prepare marketing education students to take their proper places in the business world. The club helps students develop leadership characteristics, social and business etiquette.

Future Business Leaders of America's (FBLA) stated goals are to encourage and practice efficient money management, develop competent, aggressive business leadership, and strengthen the confidence of students and their work. Students can join DECA and FBLA to make sure they are not intimidated by the business world.

With all the new members there are about 30 members in the two groups. Through all of their hardships, DECA/FBLA members are working towards their possible business careers and getting ready for the real world.

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