A Colorado Department of Transportation employee removes rocks from U.S. Highway 40 between Steamboat Springs and Hayden after a rockslide closed the road for about two hours Monday morning. Two westbound vehicles were struck by the sliding rocks. No serious injuries were reported.

Photo by John F. Russell

A Colorado Department of Transportation employee removes rocks from U.S. Highway 40 between Steamboat Springs and Hayden after a rockslide closed the road for about two hours Monday morning. Two westbound vehicles were struck by the sliding rocks. No serious injuries were reported.

US 40 opens to one lane of traffic after morning rockslide

— Another rockslide closed U.S. Highway 40 between Hayden and Steamboat for about two hours this morning. The highway was reopened to one lane of alternating traffic at about 10:15 a.m.

This morning’s rockslide occurred at about 8 a.m. near mile marker 115, according to the Colorado State Patrol. It is believed that at least one car was damaged by the rockslide, but no one was seriously injured.

One of the boulders that fell into the highway is so large that a crew from Glenwood Springs is being called in to blast it apart with explosives. That work isn't expected to occur until after midday.

Rockslides have seemingly become more common in that area over the past year. Earlier this month a Hayden woman was injured when a rock crashed through the windshield of a vehicle she was riding in. That rock was about 3 inches thick, 6 inches wide and 10 inches long. The incident occurred at about mile marker 116.

A few days later, a significantly larger boulder — about 5 feet by 8 feet — fell from the side of a cliff, landed in the shoulder of the highway and broke into pieces. No one was hurt, but a truck did hit part of the rock.

Last March, a Craig woman was killed when a basketball-sized boulder fell from the cliffs near Mount Harris and crashed through the roof of a car in which she was a passenger.

Over the past two weeks a team of CDOT workers performed rock removal along the cliffs between Hayden and Steamboat. CDOT engineers said they’re looking at longer-term options to increase safety along that zone, including fencing or netting.

Comments

Sasha 3 years, 4 months ago

My husband was directly involved with the rock fall today on 40. The police made him delete all of his pictures and wouldn't allow the paper to take a frontal shot of the accident. Luckily he sent me the pictures because something smells really fishy about this. The officer said it was CO State Law regarding the fact that he couldn't take pictures. The officer also said that we can't do anything with insurance for 20 days. We need a vehicle! Also, since it was an accident, the officer called a tow and charged us $300, while we're also suppose to pay $30 a day for storage! My husband also had to take a taxi home! Don't you think the least the officer could've done was take him home? Anyway, I'm beginning some research, as something doesn't seem right about this. The accident was much worse than the photo reveals. The wall came crushing down, and my husband said the initial plummet was as large as a snow plow. What do others think about this situation?

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xrsareus 3 years, 4 months ago

Your right something is fishy. My insurance company suggests I carry a camera to take pictures of an accident. I would go to the law inforcements supervisor and demand answers. The highway is public property you should be able to take any picture you want. I understand keeping people out of the way and out of danger of more rocks falling but if you already had pictures, why would they make you delete? Maybe this would be a good story for the Daily Press to follow up on the ask those questions.

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